Posts tagged "mentor"

JC 013: Positive thinking and flipping 100 deals a year with Geremy Heath

May 31st, 2017 | no comments
Systems are the key to a successful house flipping business

Geremy Heath is the owner and director of Texas All Cash Home Buyers. A native Australian, Geremy studied Civil Engineering at the University of New South Wales. After completing his degree, Geremy worked internationally as a management consultant for twelve years. While on assignment in the USA, Geremy met his wife Melanie in San Antonio, Texas and decided to stay and live in America.

Geremy and Melanie founded the company Texas All Cash Home Buyers that specializes in the all cash purchase of single-family homes. Texas All Cash Home Buyers has successfully flipped over 250 properties to date and have the goal of achieving 100 flips this year.

Geremy is a great believer in the power of affirmations and positive thinking and shares his thoughts and beliefs on how to be successful in the real estate business.

Five key points

  • When establishing a flipping business, you need to become an expert in all aspects of the business yourself: from marketing to raising capitals, to project managing and sales.
  • Good systems are essential in home flipping business. Defining what tasks need to be achieved in order of priority and having thorough checklists for each stage will streamline the processes.
  • A good team requires a good coach or mentor to guide you and teach you how to build your skills.
  • It is essential to invest in yourself, particularly when starting out in the real estate business. Finding and investing in an experienced mentor will help accelerate your path to success.
  • Having a morning ritual involving meditation, affirmations, visualizations and exercise is the best way to kick start your day. Long term, this practice will support you in achieving your goals.

 

Favorite athlete: Muhammad Ali

Favorite quote: “Whether you believe you can do it or not, you are right.” Henry Ford.

Favorite books:

  1. The E-Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber
  2. “The Law of Success” by Napoleon Hill
  3. The Miracle Morning” by Hal Elrod

Success tip #1 – Know how to manage these three constrains; Deal Flow, Capacity, Capital. When one constraint impedes progress you must focus on removing that constraint.

Success tip #2 – Develop a morning ritual to begin each day right.

Thank you Geremy for taking some time out to share your insights with us.

Reach out to Geremy and his team on: www.texasallcash.com or email Geremy direct at geremy@texasallcash.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/texasallcashhomebuyers/

Listen to all the episodes of The Real Estate Locker Room Show and sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at http://www.johncarneyonlie.com

POST GAME REPORT: Episode Transcript

The Real Estate Locker Room Show with John Carney

JC 013: Positive thinking and flipping 100 deals a year with Geremy Heath

Announcer: Welcome to the, “Real Estate Locker Room Show” with John Carney. Did you know investing in real estate is a team sport? Join John and his guests as they explore the business of real estate and athletic competition. The goal for this show is to grant you direct access to the real estate pros that are closing profitable deals and growing their businesses. On the “Real Estate Locker Room Show” we are getting in the ring with successful investors, developers, operators, and all of the industry professionals to learn what it takes to achieve on-going success. Now it’s time to kick-off and level up with new ways to grow your real estate business.

 

John Carney: Welcome back to the Real Estate Locker Room Show. I’m your host John Carney, coming at you today from Cleveland, Ohio. We are in the post season here, the Cleveland Cavaliers looking to repeat. Joining me from the great state of Texas is Geremy Heath who is the owner and director of Texas All Cash Homebuyers, which he founded with his wife Melanie in 2009. Texas All Cash’s primary focus is the redevelopment of single family homes in the San Antonio area. Since starting his business, Geremy has flipped over 250 properties and currently has a goal with his team to complete more than a hundred rehabs this year. Originally from Sydney, Australia, Geremy moved to the US in 2006. Prior to real estate he worked as a management consultant for twelve years, specializing in process improvement, and earned a bachelor of engineering, civil engineering degree, from the University of New South Wales in Australia. Welcome to the show Geremy, how are you doing today?

 

Geremy Heath: Yea, good. I’m doing good, thanks for having me.

 

John Carney: No worries buddy. Look, this is going to be great. I’m really interested to hear how you capitalize on your process of improvement for flipping and rehabbing a hundred properties this year. That’s a large number and a great goal. But we like to kick this show off with a little question to stretch out and get the conversation going. You’re from Australia. We’ve had a couple of Australia guests.

Is there a favorite athlete that you looked up to when you were growing up, watching sports? And if so, how did this person influence you in your athletic and business career?

 

Geremy Heath: There’s quite a few Aussie cricketers and Aussie rugby players that I looked up to, but if someone was to ask me now, “Who’s your favorite athlete of all time?” I’d probably have to say Muhammad Ali. The thing I love about him is that he was always saying affirmations: I’m the greatest, and I guess he ended up realizing that through believing in that at the beginning, so I’ve always respected that in him.

John Carney: Yea Muhammad Ali—great athlete, great champion, warrior and influencer. So, you didn’t start off your professional career in property. Will you talk to our audience a little bit about how you ended up in the United States and what drew you into real estate?

Geremy Heath: I originally came to the US in 2006 on a work transfer actually, and I’ve been bouncing around to a few different parts of the world doing my management consulting. America was a place that I really haven’t spent a couple of years, and I’d like to go deep there and really understand more about the culture and the psyche. So when I first came here my plan was to be here for a year or two with my job and then head home. But I met my wife, who’s from San Antonio. She was actually working with the same company at the time, and within less than two years we were married. So, by 2008 we were married and we’d bought a house and then I kind of realized, man, it looks like I’m staying here for a while.

John Carney: Right, the wife and the mortgage led you to believe that you might not be going anywhere soon, huh?

Geremy Heath: Yea, so that was almost ten years ago. But, after living in the U.S. for the time that I have, I’ve got nothing but love and respect for this place. I would say to people: there’s nowhere else in the world where you could come and be here such a short time and start a business and have the opportunities that I’ve had. And one thing that I really love about the American culture and the people is that through my whole process of getting started — and a big part of our business is raising capital, getting private funds to fund our deals — I never once had anybody question, like, “you’re Australian, you’re not from America, why should we do business with you?” I was always greeted with open arms and I think Australia and America are similar in a lot of ways. But the one thing where I do think America trumps Australia is probably just in the overall positivity and openness that the people have. It’s a very open place to people from all cultures all around the world.

John Carney: Right. I believe that in the American market, whether you’re in real estate or tech, if you’re in business and you’ve got a good idea and you show that you’re committed to it and you’re going to hustle a little bit and you’re willing to put in the work, the rewards soon follow. And with this show, my intention is to be able to get people who are interested in real estate, or are looking for a way to grow their asset base and cash flow outside of work. Not everybody can quit their job and become a full time real estate investor. But there are great opportunities out there for people to put their money to work for them. Other options are real estate versus shares or investing in a business. So, you have one of these businesses, and I’d love for you to share with our audience what you do and how you’ve been successful in applying systems that you would have had to use and implement in your civil engineering career into turning houses over for a profit.

Geremy Heath: Yea. In my old business career when I was doing management consulting, I studied civil engineering, but I actually specialized in supply chain management and BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) when I was working with my previous employer. So, I had a big system and process focus. Particularly in the second half of my career, in the outsourcing world, it was really about factories. We’d set up the call centers, and things like that, and it was really about having inputs that go into the factories; having the processes which can turn those inputs around and produce the outputs that are needed. So, I kind of thought of flipping houses as exactly the same thing. And I thought for me, my factory is my ability to rehab a house. The inputs or the raw materials that I’m having for that are houses that need repairs. Then my output is going to be a retail property that’s high quality, and that I’m going to be able to sell to a bank or qualified buyer. So, with that kind of mental model in my mind, the next thing that I kind of thought is: well, if that’s my factory, what are the constraints? And I boiled it down to three simple things: you’re either going to have a constraint around the flow of deals that are coming in; you’re going to have a constraint around your capacity in the factory to rehab the deals; or you’re going to have a constraint around the capital that you need to actually fund the deals. And I guess ever since I first started, it’s always been a balancing act, and it still is to this day, between those three constraints and one of them is always the constraint. So, whichever one of those three is constraining you, you need to put your focus into removing that constraint and then the next one of the three will kick in. It’s kind of an evolutionary process.

John Carney: That’s a different way of looking at the same problem all real estate investors eventually face on any level, right? The constraint that popped into my mind, the capacity, and that for me, thinking about it, goes hand in hand with capital. So, I’m a big proponent of the team, especially if you’re just starting out in real estate and you want to be an investor, and the team changes depending on the type of deal and the size of the deal. We’ll talk about that. But can you talk to me a little bit about how you started in a new country, in a new industry? You had a great background in management consulting. How did you go about recruiting your team, what did that look like initially and how has that evolved?

Geremy Heath: Yea, for sure. I think probably one of the things that a lot of people who get into real estate don’t realize is how much of a team sport it is. I know that your book has a title along those lines, and I couldn’t agree more. And one of the areas that a lot of people do get into is flipping homes—the single-family homes, because it seems like it is a little bit more accessible to people. But what they don’t realize when they get into it is that, if you want to set up a flipping business, when you get started you’re wearing all the hats, you have all of the different components of a full business to run and they all have their own complexity. So, you need to be able to be an expert at marketing to get the deals in. You need to be an expert at raising capital to have capital to do the deals. You have to be an expert at project management to be able to find the contractors and manage them. You also need to learn about the realtor side when it comes to selling the houses. And so, there’s really so many aspects to it, and when you’re trying to do it all by yourself, it’s a lot to learn and a lot to take on. But it’s definitely a passage of entry that everyone has to go through. Because before you can step up and start to hire people and build the systems for people to come and do the work, you need to really become an expert of every single one of those areas. If you don’t first master each area, there’s no way you’re going to know who to recruit, what system they need to run, how they’re going to operate and work for you, and then how you hold them accountable to a certain standard.

John Carney: So, it sounds like a familiar story that I’ve heard. You’ve really learned by doing. It’s the only real way to go from flipping that first house to flipping a hundred houses, right?

Geremy Heath: Definitely. And I think a book that, in the beginning — because I love listening to audiobooks and reading books — and one book that really had a big impact on me early, was The E-Myth Revisited. A lot of people are probably familiar with that book. But one of the big things it taught me is that you have to first be the technician in your business, and once you’ve mastered that area, you then need to be able to systemize that area so that you can then hire somebody in and have them run the system for you. And so, sometimes also people hear the word ‘systems’ and they think, “Wow what are systems, what am I going to do?” And for me, systems 90% of the time come down to having a good checklist that really defines the tasks that have to be completed and in what order. And it sounds simple, but the magic is really in those checklists and getting them right for the different parts of business.

John Carney: Right. And so with the challenges in flipping, I would imagine that every house is similar and then slightly different at the same time. What are some of the most recent challenges that have stressed your system, where you’ve had to say, “Maybe we need to rethink this,” and then you tweak it a little bit and it becomes even better? Have you experienced that recently?

Geremy Heath: Yea, I think a common area in single-family homes when you’re flipping them that people have a lot of frustration with is when it comes to the sales side. You’ve done the hard work to do the marketing, get the deal, rehab the deal, and then you’ve got the house for sale and you’re really in the last mile of the race, but sometimes it can feel like the most frustrating. And the reason for that is that the end buyer who is going to get his inspection via a home inspector, and they’re going to give you a 30-page report of all of the deficiencies in the house, when you feel you’ve already put all your money into remodeling it. These home buyers are most of the time first home buyers. So, you’ve got to understand from their perspective that it’s a big decision and when they do get these thirty-page inspection reports it does freak them out. And so, I when I think back from the very beginning to now, we’ve really put a big focus on quality. So, our goal is to really minimize the amount of deficiencies that would come up in a report, and we’ve done that through implementing vigorous inspection processes when we sign off on a rehab. And then once we get a contract on a house, before the property inspector goes out, we have another inspection, we call it a pre-inspection, where we send one of our internal guys out to re-inspect the house before the inspector gets there because we’re trying to drive a real high level of quality. And so, the end result of that is a smaller inspection report, and a happier end buyer. And I think one of the biggest tools that we’ve used over time to continue to improve that, is our signoff checklist that we use at the end of a rehab. For example, there might be electrical issues that keep coming up in our inspection reports. Then if we see it repeating, we would put it in as an inspection item in our signoff checklist. And that checklist keeps growing and growing, but it improves the end quality over time.

John Carney: That sounds like a really good system that you’ve put in place and it makes a lot of sense to me. So, I want to continue on with Texas All Cash Homebuyers. What is your business doing for an investor—for someone who wants to invest with you. You’re buying properties with all cash. We can call them distressed, whether they’re distressed financially or distressed situationally or people just don’t want to live there for whatever reason. Is that correct? And then you’re remaking them, remodeling them, and the end user for the finished product is going to be a permanent home buyer as opposed to an investor. Is that what you see the majority of the time?

Geremy Heath: Yea, that’s 80% of our business. And I guess our value proposition is that we have cash and can close quick, so there’s no inspections and additional financing approvals or anything needed. So, if somebody’s looking to sell a house quickly, we can close in as little as three days. And then we’ll rehab them and put it onto the MLS and sell it the traditional way. But it’s a remodeled home that’s being purchased by a bank qualified buyer.

John Carney: And so your team is really servicing two groups: making your investors happy, which is important, and your end users happy, right? I mean, they go hand-in-hand. So, would you talk a little bit about how you run your team and how you can accomplish that so successfully?

Geremy Heath: Yea, absolutely. I’m down here in San Antonio, so quite often with my team I use the analogy of the San Antonio Spurs. Luckily for me they’re a great team, they’re very well coached and well managed. The thing I love about the Spurs is they’re not necessarily a team of individual superstars. It’s the collective team that makes them great. So that’s kind of why I like sharing that analogy with my team, because I feel that in real estate everybody has a different role to play. And it’s not about having a team of people that are all experts in one area, it’s about having the right skills across all the areas. But the magic only comes together when the team is working well together. And I’ll say to the team, “We need to be passing the ball and moving the ball and communicating and working together as a team.” When you see the Spurs playing at their best, that’s what makes them great—the way they move the ball and the way that they work together. When we can do that in real estate, that’s when we really can exponentially increase the results that we get. And something that I always say to my team is: if you took us all individually and we went off to create our own flipping businesses, the results that we would get combined is nothing compared to what our collective results are as a team, because that’s when the magic comes together, when we can specialize in an area and help each other to reach the end goal.

 

John Carney: Great analogy, that definitely resonates for me and our listeners so thank you for sharing that. What advice would you have for someone who is listening and wants to get into house flipping or wants to scale their house flipping, going from something they’re doing as a side job to a full-time job, which is a scary step. What’s the best advice that you have for taking your business to the next level or just getting into it?

 

Geremy Heath: I think a huge element that’s helped me with my success is to have the right coaches and mentors. Think of it with the sports analogy. Popovich for the Spurs is arguably one of the greatest basketball coaches of all time. They’ve had sustained success over the last fifteen years or more and he’s a huge part of that. And so, when we look at sports, all great sports, whether it’s an individual or a team, there’s always great coaches that are involved with the athletes. So, when it comes to your personal life and your business life, I think I’d put a huge amount of weight on having good coaches and mentors around you to really help guide you in the right direction and help you find where you need to build skills, and maybe also where you’re strong.

 

Real estate can be a lonely game if you’re just out there sitting in your home trying to put a business together. So, get connected with the right coaches. And also, something else that I’ve consistently done is I’ve connected into good mastermind groups where I’m actually with others that are like me. So rather than being like a coach that’s maybe coaching me, it’s more a group of peers, and we end up coaching each other. That’s been a huge thing that’s helped me to accelerate my success.

 

John Carney: Did you actively seek a mentor when you made the decision with your wife that you were going to pursue this as a career? How did that unfold?

 

Geremy Heath: Actually, it started like it does for a lot of people. It just started with a few books, an interest, and a few books in real estate. And then there was one book that I’d read and it talked about the importance of a mentor. The light bulb went off in my head, and I’m like, “Man, I got to go find a mentor to help me with this, somebody that’s already done this before.” And I came across a guy who flipped more than 300 homes and now he was a professional coach. I probably dumped 10 or 12 grand to get started with him, but it was money well spent. And since then I’ve spent tens of thousands, it could even be in the hundreds of thousands now. It actually is, on coaching and mentoring, but it is the best money that I’ve spent, because it’s really the one thing that has helped me to grow quickly. Much quicker than I would have if I’d just been by myself.

 

John Carney: Thank you for sharing that. I agree and think that’s an important message which I’m happy that you’re echoing. We can stress again that you have to invest in yourself, right? That is a capital commitment, but the results speak for themselves, don’t they? You don’t become an overnight success in the real estate game, but if you just keep plugging away, you get there. Awesome stuff.

Well I’ve got a few questions here that we call the fourth quarter questions that I’d like to throw at you. What sports did you love playing when you were growing up, or that you still play today?

 

Geremy Heath: When I was a kid, my brother and I used to love dirt bike riding back in Australia. I now do the milder form of that, now that I’m an adult, and I’m into mountain bike riding. Probably a little safer. Arguably it’s a little safer, but maybe not.

.

John Carney: I don’t know. I mean, I’ve fallen off both. So if you like speed, you’re going to eventually go over the handlebars. Maye that’s just me. We talked about books. I think this is an important message, that we’re coming up with a great book list here by conducting these interviews and producing this show.

What is your all-time favorite business book or sports book that you’d like to share with our audience?

 

Geremy Heath: My all-time favorite book by a long way is a book called “The Law of Success” by Napoleon Hill. And everyone’s familiar, or most people are familiar with his book, “Think and Grow Rich”, but actually not as many people are familiar with the book “The Law of Success” which was the precursor to “Think and Grow Rich.” The specific book that I really love is the original edition. I think it’s from 1925, and that was really the starting point of his philosophy. The way that book is structured is that there’s 15 lessons to go through, or 15 laws. I’ve read that book probably 10 times, and it’s very foundational in a lot of the ways that I think and act.

 

John Carney: Ok. Perfect. We’ll have that linked and listed in the post-game report. Can you tell us about a success habit or a practice? You’re a very analytical and systems oriented businessman. Is there something before you step foot in the office, or after you leave the office for the day that you do to kind of help you along in this journey of being a successful real estate person?

 

Geremy Heath: Absolutely. I would say probably one of the most critical habits that I’ve developed over the years has been my morning ritual. And there’s actually another book that I model a lot of what I do in the morning. It’s called “The Miracle Morning.” And for me, I spend about an hour, at least an hour every morning going through a series of exercises. I start with some meditation and then I’ll do some visualization. I’ll review my goals. I’ll go over some affirmations. I’ll do some reading and then I’ll finish it off with some exercise. Including the exercise, it’s normally at least an hour and a half. But what I’ve learned is that if you make the time, that morning routine really sets up your whole day and sets up your whole life when you compound it. You keep doing it continually. It’s so important that you just have to set the clock as early as you need to make time for it. For me, I like to get up at [4:30]. I don’t always do it, I’ve got to admit, but I like to try to get up by [4:30] so I can knock out that hour or hour and a half before everyone gets up and I start the day off right.

 

John Carney: So, do you have children in the house with you?

 

Geremy Heath: No, that makes it a bit easier maybe.

 

John Carney: Ok, I got you. Because we have a one-and-a-half-year-old, actually her half birthday is today, it is easy to be up. Having kids trained me to get up earlier. And then as a result of that I found myself waking up earlier to get the exercise and the other things in. So, the morning ritual, I would imagine, puts you in a pretty good flow state or zone and prepares you to start your day. Correct?

 

Geremy Heath: Yea, absolutely. And if I ever have times where I get out of that routine, the first person to tell me to get back into it is my wife, because she can definitely see the difference.

 

John Carney: That’s great. You’ve got a business partner who knows you well and can help keep you on track. So, with all this being said, we’re getting ready to wrap this up. Is there a quote that you ever fall back to that keeps you motivated? There’s a lot of motivational quotes out there these days on Instagram, I kind of like the athlete struggle quotes myself, but is there anything that you think about when things aren’t going your way, you’ve got to get something done, there’s a time crunch and all these things that happen when you’re flipping a hundred homes?

 

Geremy Heath: I think probably one by Henry Ford, which is a pretty famous one. “Whether you believe you can do it or not, you are right.”

 

John Carney: That’s a good one. How does that resonate with you?

 

Geremy Heath: I’m huge on mindset, which is a big reason why I invest so much time on that morning ritual, but it’s really something that was taught to me from my first mentor in real estate. He was really big in that area, and I guess what I’ve learned with 100% certainty, I’d even say one million percent certainty, is that your thoughts are your future. And so, when I think back to when I first started in real estate, every milestone that I’ve hit with the growth of my business when it was all started is that it was a thought in my mind. So probably a couple of years into the process of building my business, I’ve started to realize how powerful my thoughts were, and so I started to set bigger goals and try and have bigger thoughts. Because I started to understand if you can believe it and you take the action and you have full faith that it will be realized. Then it’s only a matter of time until that happens. And that’s why I like that quote from Henry Ford, because if you think it’s going to be hard, then it’ll be hard. If you think you can do it and it’ll be easy, well then, it’ll be easy.

 

John Carney. Thank you for diving into that one a little bit deeper for us and thank you for taking your time out to join me in the locker room today. Where can the audience find you to carry on the conversation? Are you on social media? We definitely want them to check out www.texasallcash.com. And where else do you live online where people might be able to reach you directly?

 

Geremy Heath: You could also check out our company Facebook page which is @texasallcashhomebuyers and then my email address is: geremy@texasallcash.com

 

John Carney: Cool. Well there you have it folks. I truly hope that you picked up some actionable advice today from Geremy Heath. He is the director and founder of Texas All Cash Homebuyers. Make sure to check out the Real Estate Locker Room Show on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play and hit the subscribe button to ensure that you never miss out on the pro-tips from our guests. The mission here is to help you elevate your real estate game. If you like what this show is all about I’d be grateful if you would leave us a five-star review on iTunes, or your preferred podcast platform so that other like-minded real estate investors can find us online wherever they look for their podcasts. The post-game report show notes, links and additional content related to today’s show will be available on my website: johncarneyonline.com/podcast. And while you are there, feel free to drop your email into the newsletter sign-up form to receive more real estate investing insights, tips, tricks, hacks and other great stuff. Remember to stay focused on your goals, have fun and stay in the game. I’m your host John Carney and until next week, work hard, play hard and profit hard. Thank you one more time from Texas All Cash Home Buyers. Thank you Geremy.

Geremy Heath: Thanks a lot, thanks for having us John.

(Music Out)

End Audio

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JC 010: How to Identify the Perfect Insurance Agent with John Mark Tichar

May 10th, 2017 | no comments

You want an insurance agent with real estate investing experience

Insurance is a business expense but not all agents are created equal. Learn what skills and experience you want your real estate insurance agent to contribute to your team and portfolio.

John Mark Tichar joins us in the locker room this week to share his real estate story and pro tips for success in the competitive business of real estate and insurance.

When you shop for insurance are you seeking an agent who has the relevant expertise and knowledge of what it’s like to have skin in the game? Before settling into his roll with the Oswald Companies as a full time commercial real estate insurance agent John Mark worked for a real estate developer, multifamily property manager, single family home fix n flip investor and financial services provider.

“There is no silver bullet for success” John Mark attributes his success to showing up every day and working hard. He distinguishes himself from other insurance agents with his history as a real estate investor, property manager and project manager. John Mark’s experience of getting his “hands dirty” allows him to identify with the emotions and risk of his clients.

John Mark earned the real estate game by being proactive and doing the hard work. Find a mentor, get hand on experience and create your own opportunity.

Real Estate is a Team Sport

The fundamentals of investing are the same at all levels of real estate. The team is the same for 20 properties or 200 properties. The quality of the investment, your team and the experiences is what matters. The volume of property you own is second compared to quality of the investment.

Insurance

You don’t want a generalist insurance agent. You want to have an insurance agent who has invested in real estate at some point in time. Insurance is a line item in your operating budget. However, as an owner you must have a serious approach to mitigating risk.

Favorite athlete – Mike Piazz

Recommended reading –

  • The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley & Willima Danko
  • Talent is Overrated by Geoff Colvin

5 Key Points:

  1. Be consistent day in and day out
  2. Get up, go to work and learn on the fly
  3. To be successful you have to focus on a niche
  4. It takes time and persistence to be successful
  5. Understand the costs & risks up front

Success tip – “Duplicate your success and learn from your failures “

Thank you for taking the time to sharing your story with us today John Mark.

John Mark works at Oswald Companies in Cleveland, Ohio http://www.oswaldcompanies.com

You can connect with John Mark on LinkedIn or email him direct at john.mark.tichar@gmail.com

Listen to all the episodes of The Real Estate Locker Room Show and sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at http://www.johncarneyonlie.com

POST GAME REPORT: Episode Transcript

The Real Estate Locker Room Show with John Carney

JC 010: How to Identify the Perfect Insurance Agent with John Mark Tichar

[00:00]

(Music Intro)

Announcer: Welcome to the real estate locker room show with John Carney. Did you know that investing in real estate is a team sport? Join John and his guests as they explore the intersection of the business of real estate and athletic competition. The goal for this show is to grant you direct access to the real estate pros that are closing profitable deals and growing their businesses. On the Real Estate Locker Room show, we are getting in the ring with successful investors, developers, operators, and all of the industry professionals to learn what it takes to achieve on-going success. Now it’s time to kick-off and level up, with new ways to grow your real estate business.

 

John Carney: Welcome back to “The Real Estate Locker Room Show.” I’m your host, John Carney, coming at you today from Cleveland, Ohio. Today on the line, we’ve got a great guest, John Mark Tichar. He is the Vice President, Real Estate Sales Leader and shareholder at the Oswald Company’s headquarters in downtown Cleveland, Ohio. So, this is a valuable team member we’re going to be talking to. We’re going to be talking about insurance: John Mark works on the high commercial end, multi-family and commercial projects.

John Mark graduated from John Carrol University in 2005 and began his working career for a real estate developer and contractor called Woodfield Homes, West of Chicago, in a town called Rockford, Illinois. There he managed a construction schedule and subcontractors of five to ten projects every six months, valued between three and five million.

John Mark also provided property management and asset management services to investment property. During his time with Woodfield Homes, John Mark spent his off time looking for his own investment properties and focused on distressed and foreclosed single-family homes in the Rockford area. His first two deals yielded 25K and 20K in equity respectively, while providing cash flow: positive cash flow. It was during his time on construction projects, managing investment property and eventually owning investment property, where John Mark found his passion and true calling for real estate development and real estate investing.

Prior to joining Oswald Companies, John Mark worked in financial services, both in insurance and wealth management, so he has a lot of experience there. And over the last seven years at the Oswald Companies, he’s had the opportunity to apply his real estate background skills to service the unique risk management and insurance needs of his clients, established real estate developers and investors.

Welcome to the show John Mark, and thank you for taking the time out of your day to share your story with our audience and join me. How are you doing today?

John Mark.: I’m doing great John, thanks for your time and thanks for the invitation to be on your show. I’m looking forward to it.

 

John Carney.: Perfect. Well let’s kick this off. I like to ask our guests a question to kind of get the conversation going. This is the Real Estate Locker Room Show, so we’re going to ask you a sports related question and tie that into the business of real estate. Growing up, was there one particular athlete that you admired? A professional athlete or an amateur athlete that you looked up to?

 

John Mark: There was. My first love in sports is baseball. I’ve played basketball and football as well, but baseball my first true love from a sports perspective. And I was a catcher basically my whole entire young career as a baseball player. Mike Piazza from the Los Angeles Badgers was my favorite player. A little-known fact about Mike Piazza is that he wasn’t even drafted into major-league baseball. He was identified outside of the draft by a scout and was invited to try out for a team. So he basically came up through the ranks of baseball to become one of the baseball greats. It’s just a great story of persistence and never giving up on your dreams. Those are some of the characteristics that I liked about Mike Piazza.

 

John Carney.: Looking back at that particular athlete, I remember Mike Piazza’s playing days. He really put catchers on the map, so to speak, especially in the national league. Was that story inspiring to you as a young athlete, looking up to Mike?

 

John Mark.: It was inspiring. He’s a guy that just did a great job. His job day-in and day-out was very consistent, and as I was growing up he was the catcher to emulate. He was just a great role model that I thought would be good for me to portray myself against and emulate to the best of my abilities.

 

John Carney.: We’re going to now jump over to the nuts and bolts in the real estate side. But I like to draw the comparison between the business of real estate and the business of the team aspect, and just go back to what we learned in our younger years competing on teams. Because it’s very much a team-driven industry, and you have insight into how commercial developers and property owners and operators work at a very high level, and you’re a valuable player on their team by offering the insurance solution, would you give us a little bit of the background on how you settled into that niche in the real estate game?

 

John Mark.: Yea, part of the bio that you read discusses my, or shows my early involvement right after college. As a college graduate, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do exactly after college, and I had started to read books in my spare time about business. One of the themes that kept on hitting me, just kind of in my gut, and just a thought that I could never shake, was real estate. At that time, I didn’t know what that meant or what that looked like, but it was just a concept that I thought really resonated with me.

And so, during my years working at Woodfield Homes, I learned a lot on the fly, through just consistent application: getting up out of bed and going to your job, and doing to the best of your abilities, and learning on the fly, and just through that time I really came to enjoy and loved the game of real estate. And after that, when I came to Oswald, in the insurance base, it’s just such a niche driven industry.

 

If you want to be very successful you’ve got to focus in on a niche. Or firm is the fiftieth largest insurance broker in the country, so we have a lot of niches in private equity, construction, manufacturing and whatnot. We didn’t have a big presence in real estate, so I just decided to put to use my experience, both with the job at Woodfield, managing investment property and then eventually owning my own investment property. The foundation I think of any real estate operation in the country really, is what I experienced, and understanding the fundamentals and the foundation of what those operations look like. I feel this has really set me apart against my peers. And basically, I would contribute my success to just getting out of bed every day and hustling for business. There’s no silver lining or silver bullet that I think puts people on the map right away. It takes time and consistent persistence. So it’s just the daily application of using the work ethic that I’ve been blessed with, and going out and developing relationships and being a trusted advisor, and just over time being able to win over clients based upon my attitude and the extra things that I bring to the table that’s different than my competitors.

 

John Carney.: So, showing up and consistency is what is driving your success at the moment. Do you look back at when you made a change? In your down time when you were working in your first job for the construction company, you could have sat around on the weekends and gone to baseball games and hung out with your friends, but you chose to go out and dig up properties, and then put in the time and energy and money, your own time energy and money, those three precious resources, into fixing up these homes and running them as a business. So, do you believe that that experience just helps you identify with your clients better, especially on the insurance side?

 

John Mark.: Absolutely. I think one is: I get respect from my clients, having known my background and the fact that I got my hands dirty and have actually gone through the act of real estate investing versus standing on the sidelines like maybe other advisors and talking about the philosophy of real estate and of investing and how it should look which is a lot different than getting your hands dirty and having done it.

Understanding the ups and downs of real estate investing and the cycles and the challenges that everybody faces on a daily basis is what really sets me apart.

It was really when I started managing my boss’s investment properties. It was a small company, Woodfield Homes, and I worked with the owner on a daily basis. I got the manager’s investment property, and I applied the financials to an Excel spreadsheet and just looked at projected expenses. I applied projected appreciation over a period of time, and the math was just a compounding effect and was just a powerful calculation for me. And it just really gave me a very deep impression, a very good impression of real estate. I think that was the visual that I needed to really have the lightbulb go off and say “I know I like this business, but now I get to see the power of real estate financially and what it can mean from a lifestyle perspective.” That really made me come to just really love the business.

 

John Carney: So, that’s a great experience early on, and it sounds like the principle of Woodfield Homes was there as a sounding board and a mentor, if I’m reading between the lines, is that correct?

 

John Mark.: Correct, yes. I mean, he basically had this investment property and I went out and it was sitting vacant, just because it wasn’t part of his core business. I saw an opportunity to collect an additional six or seven thousand bucks a month in rental income. It was a multi-family property. So in my hours working for him, I would hire his subcontractors, and we would go fix up this property and get it rented and then I would sign leases with the tenants; I would manage the cash flow and the expenses; I would handle tenant issues; any move outs I would get them re-leased, so it was just a very hands-on experience for me. I didn’t read a book about it, I didn’t go to class for it, but it was just an example, or an experience that was the best way for me to learn. That’s the best way for me to learn, is just by doing it on a daily basis. And every day you learn something new and you apply little nuggets of learning experiences, and you apply those going forward and slowly things continue to get better and better, and you get better at your job.

 

Your right, that was spot on. He was a great mentor, it was a great opportunity for me to even get into that, have that experience. So for that I’m grateful for his willingness to let me run with those projects.

 

John Carney: Yes, that’s a unique opportunity that, now that we’ve dug into it a little bit more, sounds like you created your own opportunity: you created the opportunity and ran with it. It wasn’t given, it was created. I love stories like that, it’s very entrepreneurial. What I’m interested in sharing with our listeners right now is that you have that story, and you mentioned it’s kind of a smaller scale investment property. You have the opportunity every week to meet with your clients who own much larger operations on the commercial side. Can you talk a little bit about the parallels you see between an investor starting out with a few small, single family homes or a multi-family, and scaling that into something large? And do you see the team players that the larger operators have as identical, similar, different? Could you give us a little bit of insight into what you’ve learned just by playing at such a high level?

 

John Mark.: Yes, I think you kind of hit it on the head there: the team is the same. The actions are the same and the only difference is the number of zeros after the comma. If it’s six zeros, or nine zeros, or twelve zeros or what have you, that’s the only difference. But the fundamentals of property management: tending to tenant needs; having an attorney draft up a solid lease agreement that promotes tenant flexibility throughout a term of the lease; working with a local banker, or if you’re a more sophisticated operator, working with friends and family and or other sources of equity and debt to achieve the financial results.

 

Having a good team around you: a property management team and contractors that you trust, that you know do quality work, that don’t cut corners and that you understand the costs up front, so that way you’re not looking at a job after the fact and racked up an extra ten thousand dollars in costs or what have you.

 

Working with an insurance advisor to help you understand the multitude of risks that you face on a daily basis. Some of which can be mitigated through daily best practices in your operations. Others tend to be much larger that you want to have financed by an insurance company.

 

And so, whether you’re starting on two properties or two hundred properties, you hear a lot of stories about people getting into it just all of a sudden acquiring 100 hundred over the course of a year, or stories like that, which I think is great. But the number doesn’t really matter, it’s the quality of the investment that matters, and it’s the quality of the team that you have around you. It’s the quality of your experiences that if you have those, that allows you to scale quicker and better. And you get through that learning curve quicker with a better team.

 

If you don’t have a good team around you, you’re going to be struggling with your experiences, wondering why you’re experiencing what you’re experiencing, without a good team.

 

And so, to your point: it’s a team sport, whether you’re just starting out with a trusted banker, like I said before, or trusted attorneys and contractors, or taking those resources and creating an in-house department encompassing all those various needs as a real estate investor. So, in my opinion, the difference is, as I’ve said it in the beginning, the number of zeros.

 

John Carney: And to get to the larger number of zeros, everyone starts somewhere. And the nice thing about this industry that I like, or the business of investing, is that it’s unlimited based on everybody’s personal motivation. Give us a brief summary of the importance of understanding your own risk profile, and then why having the right insurance agent who understands that risk profile is critical. I’ve had experiences where, early on in my investing career, insurance was a business expense, but it’s one that you always look to minimize, right. It’s very important but people always try to minimize that because it’s a business expense, it affects the bottom line. So, give us a little bit of professional advice on the best approach to insuring your real estate portfolio.

 

John Mark.: Yes, I’m certainly happy to do that. Let’s just be honest, insurance is not the most exciting topic to talk about, right? You don’t sit around the cocktail parties talking about your insurance agent or insurance policy. I totally understand that. But you’ve hit it right on, insurance is a line item in your operating budget, right? Just like legal is, and just like your interest rates are on your loans. You can argue the same thing from a lender perspective or your accountant or your attorney. But from the insurance side of things, I think the number one thing for an owner to do is to take the topic seriously, first off, and then secondly, shortly after that, is to really take the time to stop for a moment and think that these risks out there, that they could happen to you.

A lot of people sit back and say, “that’s never going to happen to me, that won’t happen to me.” I think a really true statistical investor will actually take the time to help you understand how that might happen to him or her and what they could do to mitigate that from even happening in the beginning. So, I think the best way to do that is to team up with an advisor who knows real estate.

 

When I started looking at houses in Rockford, Illinois, the first thing I asked my mortgage broker, or banker, as well as real estate agent is, “Have you worked in real estate before?” And the only key members that I chose to work with in those areas are people that have invested in real estate before. Whether they owned real estate at the time was irrelevant, but the fact that they actually took the time and invested their time and their money into real estate told me that I’m dealing with somebody who absolutely understands each step of the process. And so that should be the same thing with your insurance advisor.

 

Whether your insurance advisor invests as a private or silent investor in deals, or has a small portfolio on their own, I think you need to take time to interview them and understand their experience in real estate, because you’ll come across a lot of insurance agents that are generalists. They’ll walk into a manufacturing company and act like they know manufacturing, and they’ll turn around and walk into a non-profit and act like they know the intricacies of a health and human services organization, and then private equity, and so on. You just want to make sure that, while it’s understandable to have a diverse book of business, you want to make sure you’re working with someone who has the majority of their book in real estate. That way they can bring to you the information that is meaningful for you, and making you aware of things that you may not even be thinking of in the first place. Because you don’t know, and that’s the job of advisors, to inform people of what they don’t know, to better educate them on how to manage those risks going forward.

 

So I think, as an investor, capital is very intensive, a capital-intensive business. You’re constantly leveraging your dollars, so the financial risks that you take, and risks that might come about with your lenders, investors, financial loss to the organization, then you have your physical loss from the properties, with acts of god that just – wind and fire and hail and so on.

 

And then you have the operations risk of property management and tenant risk and understanding how the tenants are taking care of the property. And that boils down to your lease that you have with the tenant and ensuring that they’re carrying their own insurance that will indemnify you and protect you based upon their negligence. So, there’s a number of risks that an owner has, and has to manage on a daily basis.

And the insurance advisor just becomes much more valuable than just a broker. Somebody who’s going out into the insurance marketplace. You know, you fill out an application, you get a bunch of quotes, that’s not statistics. That’s not complex. It doesn’t really show any expertise, it just shows that you can go through a process. But then turning that information into business conversation, specific to real estate investing – that’s the piece where I think there’s true value of an insurance advisor.

 

So I would just encourage all the owners out there to work with an insurance advisor that is in the real estate investment business, and take it as seriously as you would your accountant. Because the last thing that you want to happen is a 50, 75, 100 thousand, one million dollar claim situation that is totally unforeseen, that kind of hits you out of nowhere. And you go to your insurance agent, they haven’t talked to you in two years, and you say, “Hey I got a claim.” And they say, “Hey, it’s not covered.” Then you have a bigger problem than you would have originally. So, that’s just my perspective when it comes to insurance and it doesn’t have to be time consuming, you don’t have to spend hours and hours and hours on it. You have to find the right person who can understand and be that advisor.

 

John Carney: John Mark, that’s great. That’s a great summary of why investors need to put some time and effort into sourcing the right insurance provider and advisor for their team. Important stuff. Alright, before we wrap this up, I’ve got a couple more questions for you, we’re kind of getting down to our two-minute drill here at the end. You’re a motivated, hard-charging person, and you manage to get a lot done with the same 24 hours we all have. Are you a big reader? Are there any books on business, or books on sports that you’ve read that you’d refer people to?

 

John Mark.: Yes, I think a couple of books come to mind that I have read in the past. I mean, I think we all know the book ‘Rich Dad Poor Dad’ is a popular book that people mention. But there’s a couple other books.

 

‘The Millionaire Next Door’ is a great book, it just talks about daily application of financial discipline and the notion of cutting up your credit cards; that’s kind of an extreme example, but it’s applying due discipline to your financial situation and ‘The Millionaire Next Door’ is a great example of that.
Another great book that I really like, that really resonated with me (I kind of view myself as an underdog in a way) is a book called ‘Talent is Overrated’, I think Jeffrey Colban is the author. He mentions Tiger Woods in his book. About how, in order to be the best at your game, it takes time in that arena. So, in Tiger Woods’ situation, really quick, he racked up more hours by the time he was ten years old than most golfers racked up by the time they were 23 or 24. And that allowed him to be that much more dominant in the field, because at the age of ten or twelve, he was light years ahead of everybody else. In part because of his dad and then just his personal drive. So there’s a lot of ways to make up for talent and the book called ‘Talent is Overrated’ is I think just a great read.

 

John Carney: Thanks for sharing those, I haven’t read either one of those. I’m an avid reader, and I’m compiling a list, especially through talking to all the guests that I’m very fortunate to interview on this show. So, that will be included on the show notes of my website.

 

John Mark.: Nice.

 

John Carney: Is there anything that you do: a daily habit or a practice that allows you to train to be successful in your business and in your life, that you can share with our audience?

 

John Mark.: Yes, a couple of things. I have to be able to work out at some point during the week, or on a somewhat consistent basis. I think with the pressures of business, and the high-pressure sales environment that I work in, you want to have broad shoulders and you have big goals ahead of you that the company depends on you for. And so you’ve got to be able to de-stress, think through the day, process the day and just get it all out, so that way when you start the day the next morning, you’re kind of starting it somewhat from a fresh perspective.

 

And then I’m actually an introvert. So the way I recover and reenergize is by actually being by myself and just taking a few minutes to sit and process my day. I’m a scotch guy and a bourbon guy, so I’ll have a glass of that and maybe write in a journal of some kind and just reflect. The other tip is just to duplicate my successes, but more importantly, learn from my failures going forward.

 

John Carney: Thank you for sharing that. That’s good, sound advice for everybody who’s working on journaling, or a little bit of quiet time to meditate or reflect on the day. Well thank you for joining me in the Locker Room today John Mark. Where can the audience find you to carry on the conversation? Tell us a little bit of where you live online.

 

John Mark.: Actually I’m not a big Facebook person, although if you go on my profile there’s some pictures that I posted of me and my girlfriend recently. But I don’t spend time commenting on other people’s posts or looking at the feed there. I am active on LinkedIn and my full name is John Mark Tichar. So you can look me up on LinkedIn. You can also shoot me an email at john.mark.tichar@gmail.com. I would be happy to connect with folks and network if anybody is interested.

 

John Carney: Alright, there you have it folks. I truly hope that you picked up some actionable advice regarding insurance for real estate from John Mark Tichar. Make sure to check out the Real Estate Locker Room Show on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play and hit that subscribe button to ensure that you never miss out on all the pro-tips from our guests.

The mission here is to help you elevate your real estate game. And if you like what this show is all about, I’d be really grateful if you would leave us a five-star review on iTunes or your preferred podcast platform, wherever you get your podcast every week, so that other like-minded real estate investors just like yourself will be able to find us easily. The post-game report show-notes, links and additional content related to today’s episode will be available on my website: johncarneyonline.com/podcast, and while you’re there, feel free to drop your email into the newsletter signup form so that you can receive the monthly newsletter and other tips, tricks, hacks and good stuff related to the business of real estate. Remember to stay focused on your goals, have fun and stay in the game. I’m your host John Carney and until next week, work hard, play hard and profit hard. Thanks again for joining us again John Mark.

 

John Mark.: John Carney it was a pleasure thanks for having me.

 

John Carney: Perfect take care, thank you.

(Music Out)

End Audio

[31.54]

 

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JC 008: How to maximize cash flow with Tyler Sheff

April 26th, 2017 | no comments

Want More Mailbox Money?

Real Estate is a Team SportMeet Tyler Sheff who is the founder of CashFlowGuys.com, a licensed real estate agent, problem solver, educator, inventor and syndicator.

Want more mailbox money? Stop paying retail for your investment properties and boost your cash flow. Tyler shares his strategies for deal structure and offers advice on how to adjust your mindset in order to scale your business.

The mission of The Cash Flow Guys is to create successful real estate investors. Tyler teaches investor how to do the math associated with vetting a deal and how to interoperate the results.

Tyler’s the host of the Cash Flow Guys Podcast and a Master Facilitator of Robert Kiyosaki’s Cash Flow 101 Game.

5 Key Points:

  1. Put people on your team who own rental property
  2. You need an education to invest in real estate
  3. Lean how to receive mail box money
  4. Learn how to do the math
  5. There are different ways to structure a deal

 

Favorite book, Equity Happens by Robert Helms and Russell Gray

Favorite quote, “you can be fired from your job but you can’t be fired from you investments”

The Power Hour – Tyler’s parting advice for ongoing success is to tune out and think for an hour every day.

Reach out to Tyler by visiting his website, http://www.Cashflowguys.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tylersheff

Twitter – https://twitter.com/tyler_sheff

Listen to all the episodes of The Real Estate Locker Room Show and sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at http://www.johncarneyonlie.com

POST GAME REPORT: Episode Transcript

PODCAST:                        008 – How to Maximize Cash Flow with Tyler Sheff

Introduction:            Welcome to the Real Estate Locker Room Show with John Carney. Did you know that investing in real estate is a team sport? Join John and his guests as they explore the intersection of the business of real estate and athletic competition. The goal for this show is to grant you direct access to the real estate pros that are closing profitable deals and growing their businesses. On the Real Estate Locker Room Show we are getting in the ring with successful investors, developers, operators, and all of the industry professionals to learn what it takes to achieve ongoing success. Now it’s time to kick off and level up with new ways to grow your real estate business.

 

John Carney:            Welcome back to the Real Estate Locker Room Show. I’m your host, John Carney coming at you today from Cleveland, Ohio. We’ve got another great guest on the line from the Tampa area down in Florida, and that’s Mr. Tyler Sheff, and we are going to talk about the importance of cash flow. Tyler is the founder the www.CashFlowGuys.com and a licensed real estate problem solver, educator, investor, and syndicator. Tyler has been involved in the real estate game for over sixteen years and now maintains a 100% laser focus on investing for cash flow and helping others do the same. As a master facilitator of Robert Kiyosaki’s Cashflow 101 game, Tyler hosts workshops to teach the busy people how to use what they have to obtain what they need in order to build passive income and escape the rat race. Welcome to the show, Tyler.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Thanks, John.

 

John Carney:            The Real Estate Locker Room is all about having the casual locker room conversation about real estate. I’m really interested in the intersection of sports and the business of real estate. To get kicked off, I like to stretch out a little bit with just a warm-up question about sports. Do you have a favorite athlete that you can share with our audience?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Oh let me think. A favorite athlete? Maybe Wayne Gretzky. There was a time that I watched hockey when I was a kid, and I was a big fan of Wayne Gretzky back at the time.

 

John Carney:            Fantastic. I had number 99 on my bedroom door in the Oilers jersey.

 

Tyler Sheff:            There you go.

 

John Carney:            Coming from up here in Cleveland, he was a guy we loved. So you’re all about cash flow (cash flow is king), but before we talk about some of those strategies that you love and implement, can you let me know how or why real estate ended up as your career path?

 

Tyler Sheff:            It’s interesting. I like to tell people this is my second act in real estate. My first act went good, don’t get me wrong. I got involved, I started flipping houses and of course I got my real estate license, it’s going back to the year 2000. And that was all fine and dandy. I learned how to make money, but I never learned necessarily how to. That’s why I went into real estate initially, to answer your question, for money. I wanted to make lots of money, but what I didn’t take the time to learn is how to keep the money. So it took unfortunately a second act for me to figure out how to actually keep the money and have the money working for me instead of me working for it. That was a big revelation.

 

John Carney:            So if you’re in sales, we’re talking about real estate sales, you’re finding a buyer or a seller and then you’re getting a commission check, and then you’re onto the next one.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Hopefully.

 

John Carney:            Hopefully. If you’re a good agent you’re on to the next one. You have multiple deals cooking. But what you’re saying is we’ve got to get that income producing more income through assets, correct?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I call it mailbox money. I love it when I open the mailbox the last couple days of the month and the first few days of the following month, and I’ve got all these checks rolling in. It’s just beautiful every time that happens. And here’s what’s cool, John. I also get this mailbox money from properties that I’ve never owned, and just serving as an agent. Because what I’ve figured out I learned from one of my mentors, is I can take my real estate commissions as a promissory note instead of taking it as a lump sum at closing. Now by doing that I found myself putting together a lot more deals because the realtor commission no longer became an issue. ,You would think that the buyer would be paying the real estate commission if it’s after closing, right? But what we found is that with rental property it wasn’t really the buyer that was paying the commission, it was the tenants because they’re paying to live there. So once you adjust your mindset a little bit, I was able to carry my commission back as a note, make a decent little bit of interest, and then receive monthly payments of my real estate commission over time so I could take that payday and I could stretch that payday out over three years, five years, ten years, whatever the buyer decides they want.

 

John Carney:            I’m unfamiliar with this strategy, but believe me I will become familiar with this strategy quickly. So you’re getting a principle plus interest type arrangement with the new buyer on the promissory note, right?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Correct. So let’s say for example I sell a house for you and my commission on that house would be $10,000. Now normally in most markets the seller pays the real estate commission. I run across a lot of buyers that are not skilled at negotiating, so what happens is they wind up buying what I call off-the-shelf or they wind up paying retail. Well that’s really not going to help them if they can’t structure deals that make sense based on their investor identity. So instead the service that I offer to buyers in my market and actually across the country because we have buyers from all over the place that buy in my market, is I go in and negotiate for them on their behalf. Yes believe it or not, there’s a real estate agent out there that can negotiate, there are a few of us. And in exchange for me negotiating, the buyer pays my fee. That way in negotiations the seller is not concerned with having to pay a ‘realtor commission’ because it’s not coming out of their proceeds. That allows us to focus on the true negotiation that which the seller, or the buyer, is really going to pay, and what the seller is really going to receive. And now when I do that, I can talk to the seller about what their walk-away money is. I don’t have to talk in hypotheticals, ‘Well if I give you $100,000 for this house, that really means you’re going to net $80,000.’ No if I say we’re going to give you $100,000 for the house, you’re going to net $100,000 and here’s how we’re going to do it.

 

John Carney:            So that is really removing the elephant from the room on both sides in getting down into the negotiations, deal structure, and all the other fun stuff, huh?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Absolutely. Absolutely, I find that most investors are just like realtors. They’re not skilled at negotiating and they don’t enjoy negotiating. So if you’re not skilled at something and you don’t like doing it, well do you really- what’s the chances of being successful while you’re doing it?

 

John Carney:            So for all the listeners out there, when we’re talking about sourcing a real estate agent and how important they are in most markets, and looking for that extra value, now you have another tool, another question you can ask, another way of thinking about generating a better cash flow right from day one. Not only that, by removing the commission you’re also lowering the tax basis of the property.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Yup.

 

John Carney:            I’m not an accountant but I believe that that’s how that works because I’ve asked- in the past I’ve asked for the commission to be separated and paid separately out of escrow so that- this was for a property I bought as a primary residence, and that was basically to lower my tax basis on the public record, which is legal in the state where I did that. So that is a strategy that I’ve not heard of, and I’m going to be looking into. Alright, well cool. When you’re out there working for yourself on your own cash flow investments, you have- you’re representing your partnerships, and your family interest. Talk to me about the team you have and how you went about finding those people.

 

Tyler Sheff:            My team is very diverse, and as is my business. I’ve got several different classes or different legs of the business and I was probably the last person to get on board with the team concept. I thought one of two things depending on what time in my life it was. It was either nobody could do it as good as I do, or I can’t afford to hire somebody because I thought to myself, ‘If I hire an employee, that’s going to cost me $40,000 a year.’ I didn’t sit there and think- my mindset was off, that’s a big problem. If your mindset’s not right then it’s going to keep you from doing things. When you hire somebody for $40,000 a year, you’re not writing them a check for $40,000 a year on the first day they show up to work. What you owe them is $769 for this week, and then if they’re good, next week there will be another $769. So I was stuck in this mindset and one of my mentors, Jay Massey, helped me get unstuck in that regard. It’s like you’re not paying them in advance. I mean they do a job, they do a good job, you keep paying them and they’re valuable. If they don’t do a good job, then you don’t have to pay them anymore. That’s kind of how it works. So that was a game changer for me.

 

John Carney:            Finding the mentors to help you get a business structure that would allow you to help more people and to scale up, right?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Absolutely.

 

John Carney:            So with the Cash Flow Guys, I love the name because cash flow is what real estate investment should be all about, and if it’s ticking along and well-structured in advance, and everything works out, that’s what you should be receiving, mailbox money. Talk to me a little bit about how your business helps people get in that right mindset and get that first deal, or that third deal, or that obstacle deal in the portfolio.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Robert Helms from the Real Estate Guys Podcast, Real Estate Guys Radio, he said do the math and the math will tell you what to do. And I heard that a few years back at one of his seminars, and it really rung true. Like Cash Flow Guys is about educating people on the right way to do the math on the real estate investments, to do the due diligence, to do their homework, to understand what they’re investing in because our mission is to create successful real estate investors. People say, “What do you do?” I say, “I make billionaires,” and essentially that’s what we do. I teach people the steps that they need with no gimmicks, no hype, no extra up-sell to be successful as a real estate investor. And that’s the real crux of the service that we bring to the community. We’re not in it to sell courses, we’re in it to sell real estate. So there’s a big difference there and if I sell somebody one property and they get nuked, do you really think they’re going to buy another property from my team?

 

John Carney:            Succession follows success, and you would want your clients to be successful, that is just Business 101, right?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Absolutely right.

 

John Carney:            But not everybody subscribes to that, but that sounds great and I mean right out of the bat whether you’re a client of the Cash Flow Guys or not, if Tyler or one of his agents is working on a deal with you, it sounds like he’s got a system right out of the gate that helps you maximize your cash on cash return.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Absolutely right. For us, John, it’s not a rush, we’re not in a race. And a lot of investors, they go to some weekend seminar, and that’s great because everybody needs education. I’m not anti-education, I’m actually very pro-education. But they come out and they’re ill-prepared to make buying decisions. What we do, what separates us- and then they get with some regular real estate agent who’s just dying to make a commission. And it really to some degree, you really can’t blame them because they’ve got to eat, right?

 

John Carney:            Absolutely.

 

Tyler Sheff:            And so you’ve got a person that’s overly anxious to get into a property, and then you’ve got somebody who’s overly anxious to sell one because they don’t have a passive income themselves; that creates a potentially volatile and riddled with failure type situation, where I don’t need to sell real estate to make a living because I can do nothing. I can spend my days on my kayak, I am retired at 46, I don’t have to work. So I’m able to take the time to get my clients on board with the right mindset, the right skills and tools to allow them to be successful, because I’m not in this for the money. Money’s nice, yes, but it’s a byproduct of the service that we provide.

 

John Carney:            Correct, you are an entrepreneur at heart solving problems, and the income is just the natural byproduct of having happy clients is what it sounds like to me, Tyler. But along with being an entrepreneur, like real estate investing to me is bare bones entrepreneurship, whether people want to call it investing or being an entrepreneur, I look at them to be somewhat interchangeable because if you want to have multiple properties and scale up so that you can be fishing when you want to be fishing, when the fish are in town so to speak, and running at the right spot, you have to get started and then you have to have sound strategies, cash flow strategies, and it takes the average entrepreneur or small business ten years to be successful. What have you seen? What timelines have you seen, kind of an average from the people you’ve been able to help who said, “I understand real estate, I just don’t have the confidence to do it all by myself. Give me a hand.” How many years are you seeing before people are really able to sit back and say, “You know what? I can double this now.”

 

Tyler Sheff:            You know it depends on the person. We meet lots of different people, and the big part of what we do with coaching is we take the time to interview people and really get to know them and try to get to the bottom line of what they’re trying to accomplish. You’ve got the engineer types that have to know every single bit of information because that’s how they process thought, that’s how they think. Engineers are going to have a more difficult time, in other words their success gap is going to be much larger, it’s going to take them longer to accomplish the same thing as somebody who is a little less conservative so to speak, who is not as analytical to get to where they need to be. The engineer is a very risk averse type person, so it’s just going to take them a heck of a lot longer than it would the average person per say. Now I am very concerned about risk, and I’m cautious when I do things, I’m far more conservative than my wife is. And she’s not careless by any means, I’m just more conservative than she is, and we were able to get our first couple dozen doors within our first year of getting out there and doing it. Now with that process, as far as a timeline, I was in a big rush. I thought there was a badge of honor by the number of units that I had under my belt. I took a financial bath to some degree, or at least a dip in the pond that gave me an invaluable education, so we’ll call that tuition.

 

John Carney:            Okay, I mean that is a great analogy because that’s maybe skipping a valuable step.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Yeah.

 

John Carney:            But you didn’t make the same mistake twice, right?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Well actually I’ve got to say, I actually have made the same mistake more than once. I’m not going to lie, I couldn’t say otherwise. But the best thing I try to tell people whether they listen to my podcast or at any one of our events is that take the time to understand what we’re doing. In America we go out and buy stocks and mutual funds, we don’t understand what we’re investing in, we trust somebody else, a complete stranger on Wall Street to bargain with our retirement fund. It’s kind of illogical if you think about it. I used to play the stock market and now I look at the two, it’s like real estate is not rocket science. You don’t have to have a PhD to invest in real estate. Although I do have a PhD technically, I’ve got a Public Highschool Diploma, PhD, but it’s not hard, it’s not difficult to invest in real estate, but it does take some education and whatnot. And the faster you’re willing to take action, I think the faster you’ll see it.

 

John Carney:            I agree. A big proponent of taking action because results only follow action as opposed to planning I suppose. You’ve got to have that action step in there. Well great, so I mean we are talking about cash flow, and you’ve brought up some great points and some great tips for helping investors get started with cash flow. So before we get into our two minute drill and conclude this, what is your number one piece of advice for a rookie real estate investor who is after the cash flow? I might be repeating myself but know the numbers, is there something other than the math that you find to be a critical piece of the puzzle?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Put people on your team that own rental properties. Whether that be an attorney, especially a tax professional, a real estate agent. Insist that your team members in those roles own rental property because if they own rental property, they should be able to teach you how to maximize your efficiency in that regard.

 

John Carney:            There you go. We could end on that note because that is great advice, but we won’t. We’re going to now tie the sports aspect into this show. So are you ready for the two minute drill?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I’m ready, bring it.

 

John Carney:            Perfect. When you were growing up did you love playing sports or did you participate in any sports that made you realize ‘Wow I learned a few lessons there and I’m applying that to my business’?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I played a lot of sports, and I’ve got to be honest with you, I was terrible in most of them. But I did enjoy baseball and I learned quickly that I enjoy being part of a team. I absolutely enjoy being part of a team.

 

John Carney:            Okay, that’s great. I think that I learned the same thing. And are you still playing softball, or playing any team sports today, or is it fishing and-?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Well I got a little older John, and then I got a little fatter, and things don’t work the way they used to, and I’ve fallen down and gone boom a few times, and now I unfortunately don’t play sports anymore. I am an avid kayaker and fisherman and whatnot. I do some diving and that type of thing, and spear fishing. I’m an outdoorsman, a sportsman.

 

John Carney:            Don’t discount that though, like I think the outdoor solo athlete is just as much of a sportsman as the team guy playing the branded sports.

 

Tyler Sheff:            I agree.

 

John Carney:            And I’ve been fortunate enough to reel in a big game fish, and it wasn’t easy.

 

Tyler Sheff:            That’s for sure.

 

John Carney:            The fish made it easy for me being a rookie, he just swam right up and we pulled him in, but it’s supposed to be harder than that and the people on the boat were blown away. But it’s a tough sport.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Well hey, get a swordfish on the line and then tell me if that’s easy.

 

John Carney:            I doubt it, it was by no means a swordfish and that doesn’t look easy, not at all. Have you caught a few of those?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I have actually, I caught a few out in the Gulf of Mexico, and let me tell you that was an experience.

 

John Carney:            That is, that’s pretty cool. I’d love to see the photo.

 

Tyler Sheff:            Yeah I’ve got them somewhere around here, I’ve got to dig them out.

 

John Carney:            Look I know that a lot of our guests and a lot of our audience are avid readers, or their avid podcast listeners. Is there a favorite book that you have whether it’s related to sports or to business or to just something that supports being better at business that you can recommend?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I’ve got to say, the best book- and I’ll say this before I even give the title, and it’s about- they’re hopefully supposed to be releasing an updated edition. Not that the old edition is necessarily outdated, but these two guys put out so much value when they put out a piece of product that they’re just going to add more value to it. It’s called ‘Equity Happens,’ and it’s been written by The Real Estate Guys which are Robert Helms and Russell Gray. You cannot- it’s no longer in print but it’s still available from time to time on Amazon and I see the price fluctuating between $20 and $150. I love that book, I learned so much from that thing. It’s a big thick read, but I absolutely love it.

 

John Carney:            ‘Equity Happens,’ that’s good. We’ll get that up on the show notes for sure. Alright, is there a quote that keeps you motivated when things aren’t going your way? When the chips aren’t falling your way?

 

Tyler Sheff:            That keeps me motivated? Yeah what keeps me motivated, and sometimes I tend to be a little over-conservative, and it’s actually a quote that I use quite often and people have- I feel people now using it, so I guess I originated this. You can be fired from your job but you cannot be fired from your investments. So I’m having a down day, and I’m thinking, ‘Ah jeez.’ At the end of the day I think to myself- listen I have a stream of income that will remain uninterrupted for a lifetime the way I’ve structured it. So whatever’s bothering me, whatever’s bumming me out, I don’t really have anything to complain about because there’s always someone else that’s worse off than me, and at the end of the day my stream of income is never going to stop. So really I just need to put on my big boy pants, and buck up, and get back to work because I’ll be okay.

 

John Carney:            The gratefulness practice. It could always be worse.

 

Tyler Sheff:            That’s right.

 

John Carney:            Cool. Do you mind sharing one come from behind victory in real estate that you’ve had in the last ten years?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I had some properties under contract when I was first starting out in real estate. I had 22 houses under contract as a lister, or one investor. And apparently there was a riot in the neighborhood where all these houses were located, it was not in a friendly neighborhood. So long story short is on that Friday night, every one of those houses was burned to the ground. There was nothing but literally charred remains. But it turns out that after it was all said and done, the seller kind of thought about trying to figure everything out, and we wound up selling the lots for much more than we wound up getting for- that we had the houses listed for because the houses were in pretty bad condition. So it turned out that the riot actually helped the situation, it made it better because it just cleared all that rubble out of the way and he didn’t have to pay $10,000 a house to have them torn down.

 

John Carney:            That’s a good story. You have to be in it to win it, don’t you?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Amen.

 

John Carney:            Cool. Before I let you go, is there anything you do on a daily basis to train for success or to get into a flow state?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I have my power hour in the morning. I tune out. No Facebook, no email, no cell phone, no nothing. I sit back, I do absolutely nothing. I don’t read, I just sit back and think, and I do that for an hour every morning before anything else happens in the morning, even before my coffee happens in the morning, I just sit back for an hour and I guess some would call it meditating but I just call it thinking. I just sit back and think.

 

John Carney:            That is a great success tip, and it gets you into the flow state, and then you’re ready to tackle the day, right?

 

Tyler Sheff:            Amen.

 

John Carney:            Perfect. Well thank you for joining me in the Locker Room today, Tyler. Where can the audience find you to carry on the conversation if they have any questions or want to get ahold of you through the Cash Flow Guys?

 

Tyler Sheff:            I’m kind of everywhere but I guess the best way to reach out to me is through my website, go to www.CashFlowGuys.com. Of course you’ve got my podcast and all of our content information, my contact information is right on there. So feel free to reach out if you have questions or if there’s anything I can do to help you.

 

John Carney:            Perfect and we’ll have all of that on iTunes and on my website in the show notes. Alright, there you have it folks. Cash flow, cash flow is king. I truly hope that you picked up some actionable advice today from Mr. Tyler Sheff, and we thank him for taking the time to share those gems with us. Make sure to check out the Post Game Report on iTunes. Again we’ll have links to all the great places you can connect and interact with Tyler there. And while you’re there please subscribe to the Real Estate Locker Room Show to ensure that you don’t miss another episode, but also to help other likeminded real estate investors find us when they’re looking for real estate related content. If you like what we’re about, I’d be grateful if you’d tell a couple of your friends so that they can also share in the learning. If you visit www.JohnCarneyOnline.com you will see the additional content and links, and while you’re there you can sign up for our newsletter and keep in touch with me for other real estate investing insights, and tricks, and hacks, and other great stuff. So remember to stay focused on your goals, have fun, and stay in the game. I’m your host, John Carney, and until next week work hard, play hard, and profit hard. Thank you Mr. Tyler Sheff.

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