Posts tagged "australia"

JC 070: Looking Out to the Horizon with Ben Grey

July 3rd, 2019 | no comments

The Intersection on Technology and Real Estate

Ben Grey founded the New York based real estate investment company, American Properties International LLC, where he helped international investors capitalize on the subprime housing market crash. Ben works with some of the world’s biggest organizations and governments, solving business problems with technology and building his own personal real estate empire. He is one of the co-authors of the real estate investment book, 10,000 Miles to the American Dream.

Ben Grey joins John Carney today in The Real Estate Locker Room to share the story of how he moved from Australia to the USA to work as an IT tech specialist and how he became a successful real estate business owner.

Five Key Points:

  1. Real estate is not an easy business. There are always challenges and opportunities. You need to be active and on the ball.
  2. There are ways to “have your cake and eat it too”. You do not have to quit your day job; you can be a real estate enthusiast on the side with proper time management practices.
  3. There are options to purchase properties in great areas for short-term rentals or traditional rentals that will be cash flow positive.
  4. Look at different properties, figure out the market rents, and do your analysis.
  5. Any time you invest, think about what you want to achieve, the 25 year horizon, and how you are going to get there. Having a 25-30 year plan is a great asset that can produce income.

Favorite Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Australian Rules Football

Favorite Athlete:

  • Michael Jordan
  • Team: West Coast Eagles from Perth

Favorite Books:

  • F.A.C.E. technique to remembering names

Pro tip:

  • Learn how to use your time efficiently to fill it with the activities you want.

Reach Out to Ben Grey:

Thank you Ben for taking the time to talk with us about how you can have your cake and eat it too.

Listen to all the episodes of The Real Estate Locker Room Show and sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at www.johncarneyonline.com

Connect with John Carney
Facebook: @JohnCarneyOnline
Twitter: @John_M_Carney
Instagram: @johnm_carney

© John Carney 2019

 

JC 011: Travel, love and mobile home parks with Bryce Robertson

May 17th, 2017 | 2 comments

 

Meet Your Australian Mobile Home Park Mate

Born in Australia, Bryce Robertson spent six years travelling all over the world. Visiting over 50 countries on six continents, he gained priceless life experience and insight into the both the world of business and personal relationships. The lessons he learned help shape the way he lives his life and handle his business dealings.

While travelling, Bryce met his wife and inspiration Tiffany. They settled in California and set out together on a new adventure in the business of real estate.

With years of experience in construction and real estate Bryce became interested in the business of mobile home park investing and made it his niche.

His company, Property Works, specializes in all aspects of the mobile home park business as well as offering mentorship, advice and educational services to investors.

Five key points

  • Look for the right market when investing in mobile park homes: the median house price should be over $100,000 and the apartment rents in the area should be one and a half times that of the rents in the mobile home community.

 

  • Find yourself an experienced mentor in your field of interest that will show you the ropes.

 

  • Have the confidence to just put yourself out there: take massive action and learn by doing. You will gain experience and insights much quicker by doing than by trying to learn from a book.

 

  • Have integrity: “how you do anything is how you do everything.” Get the small things right, and the big things will be done right as well.

 

  • Take some time in the morning to experience gratitude for your life, set intentions for the day and your long-term goals. Then during the day it’s important to take mini time-outs; to refocus and regain clarity.

 

Favorite athlete – Alfie Langer Australian Rugby League player

Favorite book –  The Unbeatable Mind by Mark Divine

Check out Mark Divine’s podcast here: http://unbeatablemind.com/podcast/

You can get in touch with Bryce by phone +1 (714) 603-1394 or email, Robertson.e.bryce@gmail.com.

Reach out to the Property Works team at http://www.propertyworkzllc.com

Thank you Bryce for taking some time out to share your insights with us.

Listen to all the episodes of The Real Estate Locker Room Show and sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at http://www.johncarneyonlie.com

POST GAME REPORT: Episode Transcript

JC 011:  Travel, love and mobile home parks with Bryce Robertson

 

Announcer: Welcome to the, “Real Estate Locker Room Show” with John Carney. Did you know investing in real estate is a team sport? Join John and his guests as they explore the business of real estate and athletic competition. The goal for this show is to grant you direct access to the real estate pros that are closing profitable deals and growing their businesses. On the “Real Estate Locker Room Show” we are getting in the ring with successful investors, developers, operators, and all of the industry professionals to learn what it takes to achieve on-going success. Now it’s time to kick-off and level up with new ways to grow your real estate business.

John Carney: Welcome back to the Real Estate Locker Room Show. I’m your host John Carney, coming at you today from Cleveland Ohio, and joining me in the locker room out in sunny California is Bryce Robertson, who is your Australian Mobile Home Park mate and the principle of Property Works. Property Works specializes in mobile home park investments: from due diligence to assignments, syndication and property management. They are your mobile home park one stop shop.

Bryce is a real estate investing entrepreneur; an educator; and the large driving force behind the highly-geared Property Works team. A native from Australia, Bryce has 20 years experience in major construction, real estate and business. Bryce has travelled to well over 50 countries on six continents in search of greater wisdom and prosperity, which he will be sharing with us here shortly. He’s owned businesses in five countries on three continents, making him an international entrepreneur as well. He is definitely a well-versed entrepreneur and highly skilled to accommodate your local, national and international mobile home park investing needs. Thank you for joining us today Bryce. Thank you for taking the time to give our audience a little bit of insight on the world of mobile home park investing.

 

Bryce Robertson: Gidday John. I’m so excited to be here today. Real estate and sports, how exciting.

 

John Carney: I know, and we’ve got another Australian on the line; and this podcast is still in its infancy, but you’re guest number two. Your mate Reed Goossens has joined us before.

 

Bryce Robertson: Oh, beautiful.

 

John Carney: And we’re going to explore the intersection of the business of real estate investing and sports. I just personally like to draw the parallel between business and sports. I believe that business, and especially the real estate business, is a team sport, and we want to learn a little bit more about your business and your team.

 

Bryce Robertson: Very exciting.

 

John Carney: Well, to kick things off, let’s have a quick stretching question. Who, growing up, was your favorite professional athlete, and if it’s an Australian, will you please share with the U.S. audience who that person is and why?

 

Bryce Robertson: Yea, I’d say Alfie Langer. I used to watch rugby league and play rugby league in Australia, and he was an inspiration because he was a real team player and a real go-getter. And it didn’t matter what was going on, he would always come out successful. Even if they didn’t win, he always gave 100%, and I just thought that was super inspiring and yea, he was a really good bloke.

 

John Carney: So, competing in sports at a young age, looking back on it, winding the clock back now as a busy real estate professional and an entrepreneur, do you ever think about those lessons you learned from your heroes and from your coaches?

 

Bryce Robertson: Yea, and also just from my team members as well. Like, I played rugby league when I was a kid, and I was always an independent type of kid, and I soon realized when playing rugby league, that if I didn’t pass the ball to anyone else, that no one would pass the ball to me. And so that really let me know that to glide through the game with ease, or now through life with ease, that it requires building and maintaining trust and harmony in relationships.

 

John Carney: Yea, definitely. So, when you are working in your current environment, the mobile home park investing environment: talk to our listeners a little bit about what you do and how your business property works and enables investors to jump into the mobile home park investing environment.

 

Bryce Robertson: Sure. So, when it comes to mobile home parks, we own, operate, syndicate and educate, we basically take poorly managed mobile home park assets and then turn them around into much more profitable businesses that are a clean, safe environment. And our specific niche in mobile home parks is in the affordable housing space. In America and Europe, the economy is booming. Or if it’s taking a dive, there’s always going to be a massive need for affordable housing. And through the process of what we do, we provide a platform for other investors to invest their money in a very recession proof and very popular, now, asset class.

 

John Carney: So, can you just give us a little bit of a backstory on how that’s where you are now, but you started out in the real estate career right out of school, in construction management or on a construction site, like so many other operators.

 

Bryce Robertson: Well, I travelled the world for over six years. I went to about fifty countries and I thought I had it all figured out, because I had a travel pattern. And what I did, was I’d work, save some money, travel, and then run out of money and then repeat the cycle. And then I realized quickly there was a problem with what I was doing. Because at that point, my money, my income, wasn’t sustainable. So, at the end of each travel cycle I’d run out of money and I had to start all over again from scratch.

 

So, in the last six months of my six-year world travel, I met my wife Tiffany in the Caribbean. And she’s from California, so when I came to America and began my life here, we made a promise to each other to create a life that we wanted to live, yet make it sustainable. So we began looking at different ways we could make income. And we explored multi-level marketing and real estate and the stock market. It very soon became very clear that real estate was our destiny, because at that point my wife had a twelve-year background in mortgage and finance, and I had a 20 year background in construction management. So we teamed up.

 

And we began an extensive path of education, not only in real estate, but in all areas of life. And we soon found ourselves caught up in the hype of single-family fix and flips. And before too long, my wife Tiffany said to me she wanted to do something more people orientated instead of crunching numbers and searching through statistics. So, she became a realtor, and I branched off into commercial real estate investing, which I honestly wanted to do from the beginning. And that led me to the massive, passive income producing mobile home parks.

My mother-in-law had a mobile home near to Disneyland. I was over there one time and she told me she’d paid off her mobile home about five years ago, but she was still paying a thousand dollars a month in rent for the land that her home was sitting on. And I was like, “What? You own your home but you still pay a thousand dollars a month to rent the land off someone? Your landlord must be killing it!” So, I ran out front of the home, and I looked at all the homes that were in the community, and I counted about a hundred of them. And then I did the math, that’s over $100,000 a month in revenue. I need to learn more about this. And the next thing you know, I started buying mobile home parks.

 

John Carney: So that was a lightbulb moment for you with your understanding of real estate and having been at your mother-in-law’s. Will you sort of set the picture for some of our Australian audience? This was brought up by my business partner when I was living in Australia and we were running America Property Source, and talking about mobile home parks. He said it doesn’t translate over here. We have caravan parks and it’s just not like America, especially when you break it down that you have class A, B and C assets in a mobile home park community or in a multi-family community. So, would you be able to elaborate a little bit more about the mobile home parks and what opportunity you look for and zero in on in your business?

 

Bryce Robertson: There isn’t really anything comparable in Australia. I suppose there’s caravan parks, which would be equivalent to like an RV park over here, and it’s more really for recreational use, not for permanent or long-term living. But in America, mobile homes are homes that get towed around on the back of a truck, and they get set down and they are semi-permanent. But once you set one down, you don’t really move it, because it costs like five to ten grand to move it to somewhere else, to set it down and get it signed off. So, they’re pretty much sort of permanent type homes, and a mobile home park is a colony of those homes.

What we look for in a good market in a mobile home park is where the comparable two to three bedroom rents of apartments in the same city, in the same area, will be at least one and a half times that of the rents in our mobile home community. And we also look for the median house pricing to be over $100,000. By looking at those two metrics, it creates a big gap in the need for affordable housing and where else are our residents and tenants going to live if they don’t live in a mobile home park? The step is just really huge for them to move into an apartment or buy a house. They just wouldn’t qualify.

And another benefit of our residents living in a mobile home community is they have their own home and they have their own yard and they don’t share walls with people. They don’t have anybody walking above them upstairs, and they get the pride of actually owning their own home. Because in a mobile home park you can own the home and then all you have to do is rent the land off the landlord.

 

John Carney: In your parks, are the utilities paid for by the owner tenants or by the owner operator? Just out of curiosity.

 

Bryce Robertson: We try to lean towards the tenants paying the utilities, but the market will decide what’s going on there. It depends on what the market rents are and what’s acceptable in the market. But we do like to all-encompass everything so that the tenants are paying for the utilities and their rent as well.

 

John Carney: So, in order to start with one park – I would imagine everyone starts with one, when you started looking at the acquisition for your first park, what did your team look like? Can you explain that a little bit?

 

Bryce Robertson: For a team I would say get a mentor, first thing. You don’t even need to figure everything out. Just go there and get a mentor, and then you can have someone to fall back on. But yea, I would definitely say team up with somebody who has expertise and who’s done it before.

 

And you’re going to need a real estate attorney, a CPA, and a lender. You’re best off going out and searching for a lender first, because once you get a deal under contract, it’s crunch time, you’re on the clock and you don’t want to be scrambling around trying to find somebody to get a loan.

 

And then once you have your location where your mobile home park is going to be, then you’re going to build your construction crews for doing any rehabs to the homes. You’re going to have your plumbers, your electricians, your carpenters, and you’re going to find your landscapers, and all the other contractors that will be there to maintain and upkeep the property. And as far as a property manager, we do all the offsite management ourselves, and we also train people who live in the community to be onsite managers as well.

 

John Carney: That’s a great business model, as far as the management, right? Because I believe firmly that it doesn’t matter what asset class in real estate you’re investing in, if people are paying to rent space, the property management is a very critical component. That’s not downplaying any of the other team members.

 

You’ve been to all these countries, you’ve met an American lady, you’ve moved to California, you’ve made a commitment to be here, and you’ve chosen real estate. You’re in commercial on the investing and the brokerage side, correct? And your wife is on the residential side. How did you get to that first deal? Because that’s the entrepreneurial journey that I’m interested in. I would also like you to tie in how all that travel gave you the confidence to just get your hands dirty right away?

 

Bryce Robertson: I think the travel really allowed me to expand who I was and my confidence as a person, to really just go out there. You see, each time I travelled to a new country, there were a few areas through my travel where I set up basecamp. Each time I went to one of those basecamps, I had to start off fresh. I didn’t know anything about the area. Sometimes I didn’t even speak the native language fluently. And I had to start up my life there. I found that it always was the same thing: it just came down to drive and determination, and then learning the local knowledge or the knowledge of what I needed to learn as I was going. But when I was launching in each country, I didn’t have the time to sit back and figure it all out, I would’ve dramatically failed and I would have been living on the streets.

 

So, translate that into real estate and getting my first commercial deals going on. I went out there and got the base fundamentals of the education that I needed to get started, and then it was all about massive action. I was just absolutely obsessed about commercial real estate. I learned everything I possibly could and just threw myself out there in the action, and just started looking at deals and crunching numbers. And after not too long, I started to see the commonality and the patterns in what I was doing. I was learning from mistakes, and I really think, personally, that through action and experience is one of the best ways to learn. And so, I just put myself out there and just committed to it and just held up that tenacity.

 

John Carney: Did you ever have any travel experiences that were just so bad that they gave you a frame of reference, that when things aren’t going right on Monday morning in your mobile home park business, you’re like “Well, it’s not as bad as that one time.”?

 

Bryce Robertson: Well, you see I did have a lot of amazing adventures when I was travelling and I think that all of them were beneficial. Maybe at the time I’d felt that they were scary or something like that. But I think one of the biggest lessons I learnd out of all of that is: every time I look back at somewhere where I went wrong through my travels, it was because I broke one of my basic fundamental travel rules. I had a handful of travel rules that were geared around safety and common sense, and if I’d broken outside of one of those rules, that’s when the madness happened. And so, translating that into real estate, I need to stay grounded on my morals and my integrity in business and making sure that I’m not going outside there. And really, any time I have some sort of temporary failure, I’m usually just on the brink of a massive success. So, I think failures are just as successful as the good things that happen to us in life.

 

John Carney: That’s great advice. Could you elaborate on what are a few of your main drivers and what are a couple of your main rules for investing in real estate or operating your business? You mentioned integrity. Would you elaborate on those principles that you hold yourself accountable to every day?

 

Bryce Robertson: Sure. I always want to create win/win/win situations for people in any deal, whether it’s negotiating with a contractor, hiring a manager, or putting a whole deal together. I really want everybody to walk away feeling that they got something, they got some sort of value out of it. And every player in the deal wants some sort of different metric that’s valuable to them. And I think that comes down to creative deal structuring in whatever we do. So, it’s important to me that I leave every deal with everybody happy and that everything is harmonized.

Number two: Integrity. I think how you do anything is how you do everything. And if I’m getting all the small things right in time, each time, and I’m doing the right things by people, then I’ll be doing the big things right as well.

 

What else? You know, relationships are huge. So I definitely like to keep good relationships at all times, and I really like to listen to my gut. When I’m coming to a decision and I’m tossed up between, “Should I go this way or should I go that way?” I tend to stop, relax, take a deep breath, and just really connect with myself and what I really think the answer is, without any of the carrots dangling in front of me. And usually when I stop and ground myself, I’ll find the answers. But if I’m charging ahead because I’m excited about the outcome, then I’ve found that that’s where sometimes I could make a poor decision.

 

John Carney: So, in a way you pause. There’s no rapid fire emotional decisions, especially when there’s a big decision. Look, I think that’s all great advice, or a seriously good method to follow. Can you elaborate: is there anything you do as a daily practice that helps you prepare for your day, that might tie into all this? Because you sound like over the years you have a lot of experience with business and travel and real estate. Have you come up with that time of day – most people choose the morning – where you get yourself sorted out; then you go out, then you do well at work.

 

Bryce Robertson: Yea, I think the morning’s the best. You know, waking up and just fully experiencing gratitude for everything that I have in my life, and everything I’m surrounded by. And then creating an intention for all of my basic goals to be real, as if I’m already living them. And really take the time to take care of my nutrition and get myself started in the beginning of the day. And if I start the day off on the right foot then that’s perfect.

 

And then periodically through the day I like to take little time-outs, so I can regain clarity. So, things I like to do are yoga, or I might want to go surfing. I’m a big fan of CrossFit, so I love having an intense workout and just smashing any of the stresses out of my life. I feel like I’m shedding skin each time I exercise. And really focusing on other areas in my life that I think are important, like relationships and health and spirituality and fun and recreation. When we all put them together, those five areas of our life really build off each other and help generate even more wealth and success in business.

 

John Carney: So, now you’re still just as much of an athlete; you might not be on the rugby pitch, but you’re at CrossFit, which is highly demanding, and you’re surfing and you’re doing yoga and you’re looking after yourself physically. Do you plan to pick up any team sports?

 

Bryce Robertson: Not necessarily team, most of the stuff I do is individual. It can be done sort of as a team sport. I just completed my first marathon a few months ago. I’ve been doing a few triathlons and obstacle challenge races over the last few years. As far as a team sport, I mean real estate investing is a team sport. But as far as an actual athletic sport, I just like to do my sports, and I like to do them with other people. So, when I’m surfing, I’d much prefer to do that with friends.

 

John Carney: Social wave.

 

Bryce Robertson: Yes, exactly.

 

John Carney: I got it. That’s fantastic. Alright, well, if you’re an investor out in the market, and you’re unsure about where to begin in real estate, how do people find you? And what could you do to help people, through your syndication or your educational program, get in the game and start having some control over their investments and their money and their time.

 

Bryce Robertson: Yea, well, I would first off just say, “Hey, go out there and get a mentor and take massive action.” Because a mentor is really going to be the person who is going to help push you over the finish line. I definitely wouldn’t say wait back and try and figure it all out yourself. If you want to get real deals done, go out there, get those deals done. You’re going to learn ten times quicker than if you’re sitting at home trying to figure it all out.

Property Works, we provide a mentoring program for people who are looking to break into the mobile home park investing space. And if mobile home parks is not the thing that you’re interested in, then I highly recommend going out and teaming up with somebody who is light years ahead of where you want to be. Teaming up with them and leveraging their experience and their contacts, and just going out there and really going for it.

I mean, no one honestly really cares if you know it all or not. Probably the only person who cares is you, in the beginning. But most of the people out there are going to honor you for your courage, and for you just going out there and going for it. And you can piggy-back the experience of your mentor and the knowledge of your mentor. And if anybody else is out there thinking, “Oh well, you’re just a small fry, you’re out of your league,” well, they’re probably just jealous anyway. And they probably wish they had the courage that you had to go out there and take massive action.

So, if you want to get in contact with me, you can reach me at my cellphone which is: 714-603-1394. You can also email me at: robertson.e.bryce@gmail.com

Or you can visit our website which is www.propertyworkzllc.com

And we can basically take good care of things from there.

John Carney: Fantastic, so there you have it. We will definitely list all of your contact information and how to track you down in the show notes which we call the ‘post-game report’ on my website. And just to elaborate a little bit more: for someone who does follow up with you, what can they expect through your program?

Bryce Robertson: They can expect to set goals and to push themselves and to be accountable for goals and to get real life, hands on experience working on deals, and really pushing to get what it is that they’re looking for.

John Carney: You don’t strike me as a fluff kind of guy. You’re going to get right into it: day one, get your hands dirty, lift something heavy, pick up that barbell.

Bryce Robertson: Yea. Absolutely.

John Carney. Ok, perfect. Before we wind this down, we have something I call ‘the two-minute drill’, sometimes it takes a little bit longer. But we have a couple of questions I’m going to throw at you. And let’s go back to what you do to continue your education. Are there any books that you have in your collection that you just can’t put down, that you have to have close by just in case you need to reference them, and that you would recommend our listeners pick up?

Bryce Robertson. Yes. I would recommend “The Unbeatable Mind” by Mark Devine. He’s an ex-navy seal who teaches us how to gain mental clarity, concentration, and awareness and intuition, how to be an authentic leader and to avoid danger and to, like, deepen our warrior spirit. It’s a really cool book, you should just get it. No matter what you do, an amazing book.

John Carney: I will second that, it is probably a top three book that I would recommend everybody. Do you listen to his podcast by any chance?

Bryce Robertson: I have not listened to his podcast. I will be definitely interested to.

John Carney: I would say you’re lucky, only because you have about a hundred episodes you can work your way through, where I have to wait every week for that one hour to be released. But yes, check it out. I’ll throw that in the show notes as well, because I find that its good listening on my commute to work.

Alright, perfect. You’ve talked a lot about your morning ritual and what you do to stay focused and motivated. Are there any other places that you draw on inspiration other than your physical activity?

Bryce Robertson: My wife. Totally. She’s probably the pillar and foundation of my life. I really love just connecting with her and leaning to her for advice and groundedness. My wife is an amazing lady and she really just gives me so much more energy in life.

John Carney: That’s fantastic. Your wife is part of your Property Works business now as well, correct?

Bryce Robertson: She works with Property Works a little bit, and her main business is as a realtor here in Southern California. But she does play a role in property works. Yes.

John Carney: I got you. So, it’s a love story at the end of the day. You met her in the Caribbean and you followed her to America.

Bryce Robertson: Yes, absolutely. We just connect on every level, and what better thing than to have a life partner that’s totally aligned with you.

John Carney: Yes, that’s fantastic and you are very fortunate. That’s a great story. What is your number one ‘come from behind’ sort of victory that you could share with our listeners and inspire them to keep going at the real estate game?

Bryce Robertson: That’s a mentor telling me that I couldn’t do the deal. I had a deal, and my money was tied up, and I had no experience in that asset class, and I had a few days to pull the deal together. And I told this to my first mentor, and he said to me, “You know you’re dreaming kiddo, it’s never going to work.” So, I fired him and turned to my next mentor. Then I had that deal under contract a few days later. And I hustled and bustled throughout escrow and I owned that asset after three months. So, my determination and tenacity was way too big for any challenge I was going to come across.

John Carney: There you go, when one person says no, maybe that just fuels you to get the deal done even more. Well, thank you very much for taking the time to share your story with us today Bryce. You’ve already told us where we can find you and I will put that in the show notes. So, there you have it.

I hope you picked up some actionable advice from Bryce Robertson at Property Works. Make sure to check out the Real Estate Locker Room Show on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play and hit the subscribe button to ensure that you never miss out on the pro-tips from our guests.

The mission here is to help you elevate your real estate game. If you like what this show is all about, I’d be grateful if you would leave us a five-star review on iTunes or your preferred podcast platform, so that other like-minded real estate investors will be able to find the show easily. The post-game report, show notes, links and content will be posted on www.johncarneyonline/podcast and while you’re there you can sign up for our monthly newsletter, and that way you’ll get some other investing insights, tips, tricks hacks and other great stuff that comes along from time to time.

Remember to stay focused on your goals, have fun, and stay in the game. I’m your host John Carney, and until next week work hard, play hard, and profit hard.

Thank you one more time Bryce, for taking the time to share your story with our audience.

Bryce Robertson: Thanks John, it’s been an absolute pleasure. Happy investing.

(Music Out)

End Audio

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© John Carney 2017

 

 

JC 004: Reed Goossens is the Australian dominating the US multifamily market

April 3rd, 2017 | no comments

Meet the Australian real estate investor who’s living the American Dream

In 2012 Reed Goossens packed his bags and left Australia to pursue his dream of living in New York City. He hit the ground in the Big Apple hustling and networking.

Today Reed is living the American Dream and pursuing financial independence as real estate entrepreneur who syndicated multifamily deals across the county.

Learn how horse jumping, rugby and surfing provided the Reed the confidence and discipline to successfully pursue any goal.

Reed attributes his rapid success in the apartment syndication business to having a mentor, a coach and partnering with investors who already had a successful track record.

Now Reed helps investors get started in US multifamily real estate and hosts the podcast, “Investing in the U.S. – An Aussies Guide to U.S. Real Estate”

Favorite quote, “Don’t give up” – Winston Churchill

Reed’s recommended reading list;

  1. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
  2. Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki – www.richdad.com
  3. The 4 Hour Work Week by Tim Ferris – http://www.fourhourworkweek.com

Favorite Athletes

  1. Favorite U.S. athlete – Michael Phelps – Swimmer, multiple world record holder
  2. Favorite Australian athlete – Steven Bradbury Speed Skater
  3. Favorite athlete – Usain Bolt – Sprinter

Reed’s #1 tip for success is to get a mentor and surround yourself with successful people.

Thank you Reed for taking the time to share your story with my audience.

Visit Reed’s website www.rsnpropertygroup.com  or email him direct Reed@rmspropertygroup.com

Follow Reed on Facebook and Twitter

 

POST GAME REPORT: Episode Transcript

The Real Estate Locker Room Show Podcast

JC 004: Reed Goossens is the Australian dominating the US multifamily market

Announcer: Welcome to the, “Real Estate Locker Room Show” with John Carney. Did you know investing in real estate is a team sport? Join John and his guests as they explore the business of real estate and athletic competition. The goal for this show is to grant you direct access to the real estate pros that are closing profitable deals and growing their businesses. On the “Real Estate Locker Room Show” we are getting in the ring with successful investors, developers, operators, and all of the industry professionals to learn what it takes to achieve on-going success. Now it’s time to kick-off and level up with new ways to grow your real estate business.

John Carney: Welcome to the Real Estate Locker Room Show. I’m your host John Carney and today we have lined up another great episode. We’re talking to international real estate investor Reed Goossens. Reed is an Australian currently living in Los Angeles California. He’s going to tell us his story f
rom going from no American real estate ownership to an interest in over 866 doors. He’s a multi-family investor. He’s the host of the podcasts Investing In The U.S. and An Aussie’s Guide to U.S. Real Estate. and all around good bloke. Reed moved to the U.S. in 2012 to pursue a career in structural engineering. However, he discovered a passion for real estate investing. With limited funds, and zero credit Reed went from purchasing a small duplex to growing his own real estate investing firm, RSN Property Group. Since 2012 Reed has been involved in over $50 million worth of multi-family syndication. That is excellent. Reed lives up to a never say die Aussie attitude when it comes to being a successful entrepreneur. So, Reed you are sitting in the Real Estate Locker Room. Before we get into your awesome story we’re going to offer you up a stretching question. A sports related question of course. Who is your favorite American athlete?

Reed Goossens: Oooohhhh, that’s a good one. My favorite American athlete? I think I would have to go with Michael Phelps. I’m a pretty big swimmer myself, growing up in Australia. You know, as you know mate, we all like swim and get wet in the pool. And yeah, just incredible, what? Won 22 gold medals was it? I can even, I lost count. The last Olympics was pretty incredible to watch and get back in the pool. So, Michael Phelps would be my #1 U.S. athlete.

John Carney: Yep. He’s had an amazing career of ups and downs. He definitely has that never quit mentality that champions have.

Reed Goossens: Exactly, exactly.

John Carney: Just so, you know, I lived in Australia, as you know, for seven years. Just recently moved back to the U.S.A. and when I was over there I was introduced to all of your sports. The one guy that I fell in love with is Steven Brandary, Bradbury.
Only because for listeners out there. I’m going to put in the show notes. A note here to put in the show notes, is a link to who this guy is. But, I mean, he’s an Australian speed skater that is not a popular sport in Australia, by the way.

Reed Goossens: There’s a ton of ice in Australia right?

John Carney: Yeah, right, there’s no ice in Australia. Talk about being put in a position to be successful. It was the winter games back in 2012, if I’m correct? Hopefully. There was a Winter Games in 2012. But anyways, he was in the gold medal final round and I believe there were four other competitors. And the lead skater on the last lap beat it in. And took out the two trailing ones. So, the fourth-place guy, you know, was in it to win it. And he crossed the finish line first, gold medal. It’s an amazing success story. So, any comment on that Reed?

Reed Goossens: Right. He is. I remember watching it. I don’t think it was 2012? I think it was earlier. Because I was a little bit younger. And 2012 was the Olympic Game is London, I think it was? So the funny thing was, he did that, that same thing happened in the heats. If you read into the story like. It wasn’t just in the final, flipped over and he skated across the finish line. Coming dead last and then all of a sudden then coming in first. He did it in one of the heats as well. Which is, it’s incredible. He won the gold and a lot of people were not very happy about it. Well hey, you got to be in it to win it right?

John Carney: Absolutely. With that being said, let’s get into this interview. Let me ask ya, why real estate Reed? And how’d you get started?

Reed Goossens: Sure thing, and you know, I want to say, this is awesome and well done for putting on this show. The Real Estate Locker Room is a really, really, cool concept. And I think you’re going to get a lot of awesome listeners and the name is so catchy. So, well done to you. The reason why I got involved in real estate? Was two fold. One, was I just graduated from the University in 2007 and I’d been backpacking around the world for about 18 months I looked at myself and said, I can’t be sitting in this cubical for the rest of my life. I just can’t be 40 years, 50 years. Get a retirement package, and then retire. I felt like a very small cog, a part of a very big machine, which was corporate Australia at the time. So, I really was felt like I wanted to give, like I had more to give. I was very entrepreneurial. But I didn’t know where to place my energy. I remember attending a Amway pyramid scheme sort of thing and that just wasn’t for me. And it was my dad that said to me, you should try and place some capital in some real estate. You’re in engineering, you’re a civil engineer. You surround yourself with real estate every day. And that right there was the little trigger that got it started. Making me look at things a little differently from that point on. In 2009 I picked up a book, “Rich Dad, Poor Dad.” by Robert Kiyosaki. I’m sure a lot of your listeners will be influenced by that particular gentleman. He has influenced a lot of my guest on my show. And has had some huge success. In that book really, you know, materialized what it meant to be a real estate investor. And I just, you know, took that book with, you know, it was with both arms and went forward leaps and bounds I was attending as much real estate investing networking classes as I could. And it was really understanding the asset that is real estate investing. And for all our listeners out there the reason I love real estate is because there is no other investment across the world anywhere across the world that offers the four ways to make money. And that is, that real estate has cash flow. And amortization, which is the pay down of the principle in a particular property because your tenants are paying down the debt. You have appreciation, and there are five forms of appreciation, I won’t get into those. But, there are five forms. And you have the tax benefits. So comparing that to a stock investment, it just makes so much more sense. I have control over my asset. That really is the power to me and why I love investing in real estate.

John Carney: “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” obviously a book that I read and I keep it close by. Because it’s still has notes in it. I haven’t looked at it for a few years, but I mean, you know, it’s one of my. I’ve got a stack of books in my office sitting behind that I keep as references. They have notes and everything. You just never know when you’re going to have to return to that. Look, I like to draw the comparison between what it takes to be a professional elite athlete because there’s a certain amount of dedication. You touched on that, you were educating yourself, became dedicated to learning how to become a real estate investor. And so, on this show, we’re exploring that crossroads where we have the intersection, sports and real estate. Growing-up did you have an athletic background? Was there anything you learned playing sports as a kid or participating in any sports now as an adult that helps you? That helps you along the way in real estate?

Reed Goossens: Yeah, that’s actually quite a good question? And a lot of people don’t know, this about me, that when I was growing-up, I was hugely into horses. I was riding show jumping actually. My parents, who were actually teachers. I don’t know how they afforded it, but we had a team of horses, we went around the country. Being in show jumping, it’s a very, it takes a lot of dedication and time. Getting up at [5:30]AM every morning. Dealing with horses, mucking out stables, feedings, grooming, all that sort of stuff. And having an animal that is your responsibility to them essentially. If it’s not working at it’s peak you’re not going to be able to jump as best you can. Because the horse is whatever, feeling tired or lethargic. And so that there, for me, a young age it was very much instilled in me to have dedication, to have drive, to have passion, for what you do. And I think that if you put your mind to anything especially particularly real estate. And how does this related to real estate investing? Not everyone is born with ten years worth of credibility in real estate investing. I certainly wasn’t. But I actively was wanting a goal to achieve, and that was the financial freedom. And I wasn’t going to give up until I got there. And I actively pursued educating myself on real estate. In life with my show jumping you know, I was actively trying to become a better horse rider, every single day in and day out. And if you continue to put your mindset to that, and have a goal and you’re laser focused on that goal, that I think it’s very, very, likely that you’re going to achieve that goal. So sporting was definitely a huge part of my growing up. I played Rugby, I swam, I surfed. I went to Nippers. And for all of the Americans, out there who don’t know what Nippers is, it’s just sort of surf like savings for kids. Sports had a huge impact on me growing up and it has shaped me into the adult that I am today. And it has definitely shaped me into the person that is you very driven about what I do. And I thank God for the goals I set and how I achieve them.

John Carney: We have young children now. It’s really, really interesting watching them play and develop. I can’t wait until they fall into. We want to expose them to a lot of sports. Because I believe that, that does instill a certain amount of, discipline that’s required and you kinda carry through school and through life. So can you tell our audience what you’re working on right now that’s getting you out of bed in the morning excited and you are laser focused on. And bring us up to date. You arrived in the United States. You own no property, right. Now, you have an interest in a substantial portfolio. Can you give us a little bit of that story and the time line. You know, we kind of kick this off in 2012. You know, we’re ¾ of the way through 2016 now, close the gap for us.

Reed Goossens: Sure thing. So to rewind a little bit more than that. It was 2009 and I educating myself for a couple of years in Australia. Very, very, close to pulling the trigger in Australia. It was a flip or something in Aussie that I wanted to invest in, maybe split a block and I was very close to pulling the trigger and saved a bit of money. At the time, my girlfriend who was American, was studying in Australia. She had finished up her studies and I really, really, wanted to move to New York City. Because I felt New York City, is in terms of business, in terms of growth, it just had this feel to me when I was backpacking through there in ’08. That I just had to live in this particular city for a period of time. Early in 2012, we packed up all our stuff and we moved across the world. We rocked up in the United States and I didn’t have a job and I was on a tourist visa. And I just pounded the streets, untill I found one. I found one as a structural engineer and up until a year ago, 18 months ago I was a structural engineer. And within the first two weeks of me being boots on the ground in the United States in 2012 I was at my first real estate networking event. And John, I thought Australia had some awesome networking events! By gosh, the United States in the heart of New York City, in Time Square, it was like networking on steroids. I had not experienced anything like this before. And I was just so, you know, invigorated to go out and learn a lot about real estate here in the United States. You know, people don’t realize that in the U.S.A. when I first came to the United States, that the barriers to entry are a lot lower compared with Australia. You know, maybe is Aussie, I can pick-up 150 maybe 200 thousand dollar absolute heap, and try and flip it, and make a little bit of profit. Well, in the United States here, I saw that you can pick-up places for $50, 60 thousand dollars that would cashflow for you know, $200, $300, $400, dollars a month. Which was incredible. And I was just like, hang-on, this is something awesome here. And so, 2012, educating myself. And as I said, I picked up my book in ’09, and so I had been educating myself for a period of time now and I was very, very getting to the point where I was just chomping at the bit like there is only so much to learn, there’s only so much you can read. Actually get your feet wet in a deal. So, I think I had a little deal in Up State New York. It was within driving distance from New York City, Syracuse New York, is about 4 ½ hours. It was a duplex and the cash flow side of it. So, I went and purchased it. And I purchased it all in cash. When I first moved to the United States, I didn’t have any credit. You know, anyone who moves here will understand that credit is king in this country. And I couldn’t borrow. I had to pay for things all with my own cash. So, then I slowly over a period of time. I developed relationships with the local bank and I was able to refinance some money out of that deal and buy a second deal. And through that time when I bought the first deal I rearranged to the property. And we did, I spruced it up, nice new counter tops, and nothing crazy that you and I would approve of and appreciate. But something that was affordable for my tenants. And in doing so, I was able to increase the cash flow of that particular property and it was quite powerful. I increased the rent about $60-$70 bucks on the two individual units. So, it had a Gross over effect of $126.00 a month. Which was really nice, in terms of cash flow. I had done that deal and I did a second deal. I did a separate deal, it was a flip in Philadelphia and I was slowly, slowly building credit and building these little portfolios. Then it came to a point when I ran out of my own money. I just couldn’t do any more real estate. I had 3 or 4 properties. You know, very cheap properties under my belt. It in deed, maybe the portfolio was worth then $200,000 maybe $250,000. What I started to realize was hey, I need to up my game here. I saw the power of multi- family real estate. A buddy came down from Canada at the end of 2013, and we had dinner. Hey guess what I am doing? These duplexes in upstate New York. Look how good I’m Killin’ it! Reed, that’s awesome. I closed on a 70-unit apartment building in Canada. I was like, what?! How did you do that? What does that even mean? And he went on to explain the power of “The cap rate theory.” That if you force the net operating income, you can increase the cash flow for one unit. You can also force the value of the property. That was really, really, powerful for me. Because I started to see that on my smaller duplexes, even if I wasn’t forcing value, I was increasing cash flow. And the key was commercial real estate. You have to get involved in commercial real estate. But, you know, commercial real estate is a lot more expensive. Instead of buying two duplex, you might be buying a hundred units or 50 units, or whatever it might be? But I saw the economy as scale there. That if I could apply what I was doing on the duplexes to the large multi-families then I would be able to build a huge wealth and crate a lot of passive income, a lot of cash flow at the time. So, that was sort of started my journey from 2012 to 2013. In 2014 I started RSN Property Group and I got a coach/mentor, and we definitely were on personal branding. And getting into the day, people will invest in your deal because they invest in you. The deal might not necessarily matter than much. They actually invest in you because they trust you. You have credibility with them. So, how do you build credibility without being born with it? Well, there’s a number of ways. I know John, you’re an expert at it, as well, writing a book. Or being a key person of influence in your sphere. And there are those difficult things that you can do to brand yourself in a certain way that will attract real estate investors. And over a period of the last 18 months I’ve been able to get involved in I think 866 units and I have an equity stake in all those. And I’ve been able to raise a bunch of capital. And I’m slowly building towards something awesome. And you know, my journey is not over, by no means, it’s only just getting started. And I want to continue to grow my portfolio and continue to buy as many multi-family real estate properties as I possibly can. So, that’s caught everyone up to date a little. It’s a bit of a journey, but it’s certainly a lot of fun along the way.

John Carney: Yeah, that’s a great story. And I believe it’s common at least from my experience. In surrounding yourself with the right people, right? I mean, you’re the average of the people you meet and choose to hang out with. And with the common interest you’re with these real estate people now, through networking, right? And you’ve grown into the investor you are today and with the sights on growing more. You know, I talk to a lot of first time investors and help people get started in the game. I always start by recruiting the team when I go to new markets. I want to touch on your team. But, I think it’s an important to note what you just said, starting zero properties. That first rental which you had to drive 8 hours round trip to get to and then you just turn the clock forward a few years, all the blood, sweat, and tears turns into 866 doors. So, I mean, that’s just a great story. You know, that is the American dream isn’t it, Reed?

Reed Goossens: Right,

John Carney: you’re living it.

Reed Goossens: Exactly.

John: Leading by example. So, you know, I’m a big believer in growing into who you are today, it doesn’t happen overnight and if you set your sights, continue to set your sights higher and raise that bar you will continue to grow. So, awesome, thank you for sharing that part of your story. So, you know, I just moved back from Australia to Cleveland. I haven’t lived in Cleveland for 19 years. It’s a completely different city and we won’t go on about how expensive real estate is in Australia. I had to get the lay of the land here and I was able to do it pretty quickly. For the last 120 days I’ve really been figuring it out and running the numbers and doing the math to define where my next acquisition is going to be. But, you know, it also requires putting together the right team.

Reed Goossens: Exactly.

John Carney: So I want you to talk a little bit about how you went about assembling your team that supports you. What it means to you, and you know, aside from you who’s driving this, you’re the quarterback. Who’s the key-player?

Reed Goossens: Yeah, that’s a good question. I think, you know, I had you on my show, a while ago. I was very taken. Very impressed by what your show produced. Enjoying you book about real estate is a team sport. That really resonated with me, that is completely true. The key-players on my team are a couple of other syndicators. I can name, names, I don’t have to name, names, it doesn’t really matter. But, the power of understanding that you not, in real estate you can’t do it by yourself. And on particularly on large multi-family units you can’t go and raise all the capital. You can’t go and find the deal. You can’t do the PPM. You can’t go and do the financing all by yourself. So, splitting it up amongst people who are capable of raising the capital. Capable of getting financing. Capable of finding deals. That’s really, really, important. And you know, if yes, I have an equity stake in 866 units. But, we all do. And so without the team we wouldn’t have gotten to that amount of units so quickly. If it was just me, Reed Goossens doing it by myself, I wouldn’t have been able to scale as quickly. And that’s really important to the listeners out there. Surround yourself with the right credible people, get a mentor, get a coach. Then work on your personal brand and understand that you’re not going to be able to do this by yourself. And it’s okay to use other people and leverage other people’s skills and abilities to help you scale your portfolio. So, I think that is really important, in my investing career, having a coach and getting a mentor is, without them I was, first started leveraging their ability. They had done some deals. And I leveraged their experience to then go and show my investors. To say, “Hey, I’m partnering with these awesome guys. They’ve done “X,Y & Z” or have done a couple of deals and they’re looking to grow like I am And then all of a sudden I’ve got mentees who I mentor. And then they’re leveraging my ability to and they’re raising capital. Because I’ve been involved in 866 units in the 18 to 24 months. So the cycle goes around. I’ve got high hopes on that. I’m helping other people and continue to help other people where I can because the power of your team is very, very important.

John Carney: It definitely is and I suppose you just feel obligated, don’t ya to pay it forward, when someone comes to you. And you see the fire in their eyes and say, “Hey, you know, I’ve learned this, I can help you out.”

Reed Goossens: Sure.

John Carney: And it’s not always, you know, a lot of the times, you know, I’m always opened to directing people to the right advice. So, I mean, I think you’ve touched on it.
If you’re a rookie real estate investor who wants to break out, who wants to go, tapped out with cash and bank loans and wants to elevate their game to another level, you’re advising that they go out and find a mentor or a coach, and has the same vision as they do, and ask for help. Would you say that’s?

Reed Goossens: 100%, John. That is key, and as I touched on before, leverage a mentor or a coach helped me to get where I am today and I was able to leverage their skills and abilities. The number one thing that I like to talk about when you’re presenting a deal to an investor, a potential investor. They’re going to go say, “Well, how much experience do you have?” Well, then you’re not going to have any experience because you might not have done this before. So having a team, showing the investor that you have a team around you and that you have a great team, and a great package, and a great deal. And that goes to the core of, I trust you, I trust your credibility, I trust the team you’ve got established around you that you’re going to invest. And raising that first $100,000.00 or $150,000.00 or whatever it might be in syndication, that’s what I do, can be tough. And once you do that, it’s a little bit of a snowball effect. Like people start referring you to other clients. You start building a track record and things become a little easier. But it does take a little bit of time and effort to get that first deal done and I always like to say, that you don’t get to deal 15 without deal number 1. So, that’s my little motto.

John Carney: Right, loads of action in between. You’ve shared an incredible story. And before we get into the “2 minute drill” here. Think back really, quickly, certainly there’s a recent obstacle that had you banging your head against the locker door, so to speak. Can you share one of those stories with us?

Reed Goossens: Yeah,

John Carney: I always learn and so I’m listening with opened ears because, they are just obstacles in the way when you a real estate investor. I really enjoy learning from how others navigate those obstacles. To find their way to crush it.

Reed Goossens: Sure thing yeah so. I think the biggest one recently. And I’m going to get pretty in depth now. It’s a little bit more advanced. But, I don’t really care. Your listeners will learn a lot from this. On some recent deals that I was involved in I had raised a bunch of money and what had happened was that the deal sponsor, who was the person who comes along and essentially puts their neck on the debt, they sign on the dotted line,
didn’t want to have what was called “sophisticated investors.” And for all those people who are listening understand the FCC rules. Sophisticated investor means they are not accredited, non-credited means, you don’t earn $200,000.00 or more a year. Or you’re not worth a million bucks. So that meant a lot of my investors in the deal were walked off the table to leave a good portion of money. Like, I’m talking $500,000.00 to $600,000.00 off the table. Now, I didn’t know this till like D-Day, so it really frustrated me, that I couldn’t one, perform on what I was going to sell what I was going to do. And two, I, communication wasn’t there to say, okay, we’re only going to take accredited investors. Lesson learned. But, in saying that, I can’t then leave those investors out in the cold because you know there’s other rules in the FCC Laws that you can use on the sophisticated investors in your capital raising abilities it just meant for me as a business owner and RSN Property Group to start finding some smaller deals. I needed to start getting my other non accredited investors involved in some smaller deals and that’s why I went to Kansas City, just recently to check out a 48 unit, a 50 unit. I want to be in a place in my business where I can if someone comes to me and says, “Hey, Reed I really want to invest with you.” I love what you’re doing. I need to be able to put them in a deal and that’s just me as a business owner and to find the right deal to help them navigate the world of multi-family investing in the United States. So that’s definitely one thing that I recently had me banging my head against the wall. Lesson learned. I understood where the deal response was coming from. That meant I had to change my action in my own business and say, “hey” I need to start going out and increase my deal flow on some slightly smaller sized deals to get my sophisticated investors involved. So, that’s definitely one of them recently.

John Carney: Yeah, sounds like it’s one of those cases where you’re insanely frustrated in the moment but then it turns you’ve learned a lesson. You’ve built a system into your business and then almost, you know, the obstacle becomes the way, and you have almost come up with a solution to handle a different investor classes

Reed Goossens: Yeah, it’s definitely lesson learned as I said. I haven’t executed all on a smaller deal with my sophisticated investors yet. But I will be ready to go by the year’s end. I should have 4 or 5 or 6 of them involved in a sale of a smaller deal in the Mid-West somewhere? Just trying to find that deal right now.

John Carney: Right, you’re on a hunt. That’s the part I like.

Reed Goossens: Exactly.

John Carney: Before we wrap up the show here with a “Two-minute drill.” I’ve got ten questions and they are coming at ya starting right, now! What sport did you love playing as a kid, and the lesson, one lesson.

Reed Goossens: It probably would have been Rugby. I think the biggest lesson is that, I like my show jumping and then being in the equestrian world, that was a very individualist sport. I think being on the Rugby field, there’s 14 other guys out there slogging in the trenches. It’s a team sport, you know and that was really powerful.
My dad always said, “You got to be involved in team sports. It helps with leadership. It helps in just understanding the dynamics of other people at work.” And that is really powerful and that was a really good lesson learned over the years coming in now into my adult life.

John Carney: Number 2. What sport are you currently participating in today that you’re enjoying and lessons from that?

Reed Goossens: I still get out in the water for a surf every now and then. I really love surfing. It’s a great way to just, you know, life can be go, go, go, go and it’s just a great way to get out on a Saturday or Sunday, early before…as the sun is rising and just take a great big breath and let all the worries and stresses of the world just drift away. You know catch a few waves and just enjoy the morning. I love getting out and in particular a nice fresh still winter’s morning which is a bit more crisp and just get in the water and getting some nice waves. It always makes me feel good.

John Carney: Yeah, the cold salt water, love it and miss it. Other than Robert Kiyosaki’s “Rich Dad, Poor Dad”, do you have a favorite sports book or business book that you’ve just finished that’s on your list?

Reed Goossens: Yeah, I have one, by Dale Carnegie “How to Influence People” that one? I’ll have to send you to it? “How to talk and Influence People” something along those lines? I’ll have to send you to it? Dale Carnegie, very important book in my career. The other one I love is, “The Four Hour Work Week” by Tim Ferriss. Very, very good book. I really enjoy that book.

John Carney: What a great title.

Reed Goossens: It is, it is.

John Carney: What a way to sell books.

Reed Goossens: The four-hour work week. I mean, what I sign up?

John Carney: I know, I know. I read it. I can’t imagine that there’s an entrepreneur out there that has not read that book unless you’re well established before it was published. But, even then, I mean that is a great book. He does great work. I’m a big fan of Tim Ferris. One quote that keeps you motivated? And this can be something that doesn’t have to be from a person. It can be something that you came up with.

Reed Goossens: Yeah, one quote Winston Churchill says, “Never give up.” And that is just never, ever, give up. It doesn’t matter if the chips are down. Don’t give up, have belief in yourself as I said earlier in the show. If you continue to be laser focused on your goal, whatever that might be. It might be real estate investing or something completely different, then do it and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise until you achieve that goal. And anyone can literally achieve anything you put your mind it. So, I’m a huge believer in mindset. And if you are so motivated in it and dogged it about your approach, you’ll achieve those goals, you’ll get there.

John Carney: Thank you. What is your number one come from behind victory in real state and what did you learn from that?

Reed Goossens: Come from behind victory? I don’t know if I’ve had one yet? I had an issue with a flip in Philadelphia with the contractor. Definitely at one stage I thought the chips were down. I had done a couple of flips in Philly. I’m not going to get into the weeds but, it was some issues with the city and trying to get this thing on line and I was constantly just pouring money into it. And we did, we ended up getting it over the line. It was probably six months later than scheduled but we got it done and we got it sold for a small profit. We got our money back and I definitely thought six months earlier, geez this is going to you know, the explicit excrement is going to hit the fan. So, I definitely go to lesson’s learned on that. Flipping is not my business, it’s not my job, it was hard to manage from out of state and I definitely just needed to focus on my multi-family investments of which I have had lots of success in.

John Carney: Perfect. Alright, now we’re asking who’s your favorite athlete of all time is?

Reed Goossens: Favorite athlete of all time? I think, Usain Bolt, would have to be my favorite athlete of all time. I love his poses that he does that he does. Just the sort of grin as he’s running across the finish line, you know, ten yards in front of the next person. I think he’s a real inspirational guy. He comes from Jamaica, I just love his attitude. I just love the way he leads his life. So, really, really, inspirational for me.

John Carney: Yeah, you watch him run and blow everyone out of the water and it doesn’t even look like he’s breathing hard. I

Reed Goossens: Or he’s even trying hard. It’s like, this guy’s a freak.

John Carney: Yeah, he doesn’t sweat.

Reed Goossens: Yeah, exactly.

John Carney: What gets you into your flow state or if you need to get into the zone and focus on something? Do you have a practice that you can share?

Reed Goossens: Yeah, if I have to really focus on something and I’m sitting at home. I like to get out of my. If I have to really hit something on the head. As I say, eat the green frog” or whatever it is? You know, the first thing you don’t want to do is? First thing in the morning, I like to get up, go for an exercise and then have my breakfast and then get out of the house and go somewhere where you can concentrate. It might be a coffee shop, it might be the library and I get so much more work done when I get out of the house. Because being in the house can distract you a little bit. So, you can’t get work done as much. So, it’s just like turning off your phone, turning off your Internet and doing whatever you need to get done, done. And it’s surprising how quickly it does get done and then you’ve got that thing done and out of the way that you’re sort of regretting to do. So, it’s definitely one of those things that changing up your environment a little bit that way you’re working to be more productive.

John Carney: And would that lead into the next question? Which is, do you train for success?

Reed Goossens: Yeah. definitely, I’m a huge believer of in meditation. I love going and trying to do yoga once a week. Just to try and it’s very much like surfing, it’s therapeutic. Just like to get away from everything for a little bit and I also like to work out a lot as well because it’s another way that I can go and just a great way to start the day. It’s a great way to be energized. But it’s also a great way to keep your mind set focused, keep focused. People, there have been studies shown other people that workout live longer, they’re more healthy, they are more active and have better mindset. Being an entrepreneur you want to have all those things and you want to continue to do what you do, which is the business of real estate investing.

John Carney: Yeah, I agree with you on the working out part. My wife will see if I haven’t been to the gym in a couple of days tell me to go lift something heavy. That’s why I love her so much. All right, finally, what is your number one tip for winning more?

Reed Goossens: The number one tip for winning more? I think it would have to be is taking a page out of your book mate and as you said earlier in the show already you are only as successful as the people you surround yourself with. So, going back to what I the underlining theme of this particular episode was, get a mentor, surround yourself with successful people. That’s all, that’s my number one tip for winning.

John Carney: Awesome, can you tell me how our guest can find you if they want to continue the conversation?

Reed Goossens: Let’s do it. So, you can hit me up at – Reed@rmspropertygroup.com, or you can hit me up at my, I’m also have a Podcast, which is, as John mentioned, Investing in the U.S. Aussie. U.S. Guide to Real Estate. Educating international investors about the awesomeness of the investing in and cash flow property here in the United States. Check it out on iTunes and if you’re ever coming through L.A. please hit me up. I love hanging out for beer, or coffee, or going out for lunch. Whatever it might be, just hit me up at – Reed@rmspropertygroup.com.

John Carney: Awesome. Well there ya have it folks. I truly hope that you picked up some useful tips by tuning into today’s show. Thank you, Reed it was a pleasure having you on the show today. And I’m sure our listeners have some actionable tips that they can implement immediately. You can check out the show notes on iTunes and while you’re there, please subscribe to the podcast and we will continue to deliver awesome guests like Reed, who are crushing it, and hitting home runs here in the real estate game. You can also visit – www.johncarneyonline.com for a more comprehensive review of today’s show, in the show notes. And we look forward to bringing you another episode next week. I’m your host – John Carney and tune in next week, until then, work hard, play hard, and profit hard, thank you Reed.

Reed Goossens: Thanks mate.

John: Alright, have a good one.

[38:37]

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